Genetics

Beware the 'molecular parasites' involved in aging and disease

If you've ever seen a petunia with artfully variegated petals, then you've seen transposons at work. The flower's showy color patterns are due to transposable elements, or DNA sequences that can move locations within a genome. ...

Oncology & Cancer

Sensing 'junk' RNA after chemotherapy enhances blood regeneration

Chemotherapy is widely used to treat cancer patients. During the treatment, chemotherapeutic agents affect various biochemical processes to kill or reduce the growth of cancer cells, which divide uncontrollably in patients. ...

Oncology & Cancer

Tumors hide from the immune system with help from this protein

Cancer drugs called immune checkpoint inhibitors boost the immune system's ability to find and destroy tumor cells, but they don't work for most patients. Researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Massachusetts ...

Genetics

'Jumping' DNA regulates human neurons

The human genome contains over 4.5 million sequences of DNA called "transposable elements," virus-like entities that "jump" around and help regulate gene expression. They do this by binding transcription factors, which are ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Genetic studies reveal how rat lungworm evolves

Rat lungworm is a parasitic disease, spread through contaminated food, which affects the brain and spinal cord. Now, researchers report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases that a detail analysis of the genetics of the rat ...

Genetics

Researchers unlock the secrets of liver regeneration

In a recent study published in the journal Developmental Cell, NYU Abu Dhabi researchers have reported a new way in which the liver is primed to regenerate itself. They found that by stripping parts of the epigenome, which ...

Oncology & Cancer

'Jumping genes' drive many cancers

Mistakes in DNA are known to drive cancer growth. But a new study, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, heavily implicates a genetic phenomenon commonly known as "jumping genes" in the growth of tumors.