Type 2 Diabetes

German diabetes risk test optimized for mobile devices

The German Institute of Human Nutrition (DIfE) has updated the online version of its German Diabetes Risk Score and has optimized it for mobile devices. The test now takes into account the familial predisposition and is immediately ...

Jun 22, 2016
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Diabetes portal adds data, more powerful search tools

The AMP Type 2 Diabetes Knowledge Portal (link is external) online library and discovery engine has greatly expanded data and search capabilities to accelerate the pace of scientific advancement. Customizable and simplified ...

Jun 13, 2016
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How diabetes disrupts the immune system

New findings into how type 1 diabetes disrupts the immune system and impacts a person's risk of developing the condition have been uncovered by a team of researchers from the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research – ...

Jun 03, 2016
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Diabetes mellitus type 2 – formerly non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or adult-onset diabetes – is a metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood glucose in the context of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. The classic symptoms are excess thirst, frequently having to urinate, and constant hunger. Type 2 diabetes makes up about 90% of cases of diabetes with the other 10% due primarily to diabetes mellitus type 1 and gestational diabetes. Obesity is the primary cause of type 2 diabetes in people who are genetically predisposed to the disease.

Type 2 diabetes is initially managed by increasing exercise and dietary modification. If blood sugars are not lowered by these measures, medications such as metformin or insulin may be needed. In those on insulin there is typically the requirement to routinely check blood sugar levels.

Rates of diabetes have increased markedly over the last 50 years in parallel with obesity. As of 2010 there are approximately 285 million people with the disease compared to around 30 million in 1985. Long-term complications from high blood sugar can include heart attacks, strokes, diabetic retinopathy where eye sight is affected, kidney failure which may require dialysis, and poor circulation of limbs leading to amputations. The acute complication ketoacidosis is uncommon unlike in type 1 diabetes, nonketonic hyperglycemia however may occur.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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