Weight Gain

The myth of the "Freshman 15"

It's nearly back-to-school time. For many recent high-school graduates, the next week or two represent the beginning of a whole new chapter: post-secondary education. Of all the challenges college freshmen need to contend ...

2 hours ago
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Anorexia resurgence can occur after smoking cessation

(HealthDay)—Smoking cessation may be associated with resurgence of anorexic symptoms in patients with a history of anorexia nervosa, according to a clinical case report published in the September issue of the International ...

Aug 26, 2015
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Engineered hot fat implants reduce weight gain in mice

Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a novel way to engineer the growth and expansion of energy-burning "good" fat, and then found that this fat helped reduce weight gain and lower blood glucose ...

Aug 20, 2015
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Weight gain is an increase in body weight. This can be either an increase in muscle mass, fat deposits, or excess fluids such as water.

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How neurons get their branching shapes

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New 'Tissue Velcro' could help repair damaged hearts

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