Nursing professor claims teens are "sleep texting"

by Bob Yirka weblog

Nursing professor Elizabeth Dowdell, of Villanova University has reported in an interview with a CBS news affiliate in Philadelphia, that she has discovered a new phenomena she calls "sleep texting." She says it's just like what it sounds like—teenagers sending text messages while at least partially asleep. She notes that it occurs when a teen receives a text, becomes aware of their phone beeping, and then responds—quite often with gibberish, but sometimes with words they never intended to use.

Dowdell attributes the behavior to overextended teens and says being partially woken by a beeping phone on a regular basis can lead to deprivation, weight gain, depression and other .

Dowdell doesn't cite any studies on this newly discovered side-effect of texting, but says she's found it occurs most often when a teen receives a message after falling into a —usually an hour and a half to two hours after falling into their sleep cycle. Most report not being able to remember hearing their phone beep, answering it, or writing a reply.

She gives an example of an ex boyfriend or girlfriend sending a text in the middle of the night lamenting a breakup, provoking a response by the person suddenly yanked out of a deep sleep. Replies made while in such a state, quite naturally, can be quite candid and not framed in the same way were the person wide awake and fully cognizant of the situation. It's likely due, she adds to teens overextending themselves, or to being "overplugged," a term she uses to describe teens who are constantly plugged into , text messaging or other forms of via electronic media. She doesn't say if she's seen instances of sleep texting in adults or how prevalent she believes it is among teens.

She does imply, however, that it appears teens who are somewhat sleep deprived appear to be more at risk of answering texts while sleeping than are teens who get the required eight to ten hours of sleep a night a teen naturally needs.

The answer of course, Dowdell says, is for teens to unplug at night, or to at least put the phone out of reach while sleeping.

More information: via CBS news

Related Stories

Video gaming teens sleep less: study

May 16, 2011

Teens who play a lot of video games are likely to sleep less than the eight to nine hours a night recommended for the age group, researchers said Monday.

Texting tops with US teens

Oct 15, 2010

Market tracker Nielsen Co. on Thursday released a study confirming what many US parents already knew: teens love to use mobile phones to swap text messages.

Teens, texting and the sleep connection

Sep 23, 2009

Between their crazy schedules and upside-down circadian rhythms, teens always have been somewhat sleep-deprived. Now technology is making it worse. Teens are not just texting, instant-messaging and surfing Facebook all day; ...

Teen sleep deprivation related to weight gain

Oct 24, 2011

Sleeping less than 8 hours a night may be linked to weight gain in teens, shows a new study presented at CHEST 2011, the 77th annual meeting of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP). Furthermore, obesity was linked ...

Recommended for you

Colorado proposes edible pot ban, then retreats

1 hour ago

Colorado health authorities suggested banning many edible forms of marijuana, including brownies, cookies and most candies. Then the officials quickly backtracked after the suggestion went public.

User comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

TransmissionDump
2.6 / 5 (5) Feb 18, 2013
snds 2 tru bt 1 thng dnt no <3 me :(
GraemeMcRae
5 / 5 (1) Feb 18, 2013
"a new phenomena" is a number mismatch. Back to grammar school for this author.
VendicarE
3 / 5 (2) Feb 19, 2013
They are becoming 1 with Borg.
alfie_null
3 / 5 (2) Feb 19, 2013
Back to grammar school for this author.

This is not a complete sentence. -1