Simple measures may prevent transmission of stomach ulcer bacteria

June 24, 2009
Simple measures may prevent transmission of stomach ulcer bacteria
This is Anders Janzon from the University of Gothenburg. Credit: University of Gothenburg

The stomach ulcer bacterium Helicobacter pylori is not transmitted through drinking water as previously thought, but rather through vomit and possibly faeces. This is shown in a thesis at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. It is therefore possible to prevent the spread of the bacterium in developing countries through some fairly simple measures.

'Taking some cheap but powerful measures may prevent the spread of the bacterium. It could be enough to isolate vomiting patients especially from small children for a short period of time, since is not able to survive for long outside the stomach. If isolation is not possible, it may suffice to pay extra attention to good hygiene', says doctoral student Anders Janzon.

The research team analysed the , lake water and wastewater in an area in Dhaka in Bangladesh, where the bacterium Helicobacter pylori is very common. The results show that while the ETEC is often present in the drinking water, Helicobacter pylori is not. Other studies have shown that new cases of Helicobacter pylori tend to pop up in connection with various diarrhoea illnesses, and this pointed the research team in the right direction.

'We analysed vomit and diarrhoea from cholera patients, and found large amounts of active Helicobacter pylori. We therefore conclude that vomit is a very likely source of new infections', says Janzon.

Source: University of Gothenburg (news : web)

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