Gene linked with human kidney aging

October 16, 2009

A gene has been associated with human kidney aging, according to researchers from Stanford University, the National Institute on Aging, the MedStar Research Institute, and the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology. In work published on October 16 in the open-access journal PLoS Genetics, the investigators claim that their approach, which combines sequential transcriptional profiling and eQTL mapping, can be applied to any phenotype of interest to help find other genetic associations.

Kidneys age at different rates, such that some people show little or no effects of kidney aging whereas others show rapid functional decline. Determining genetic factors associated with different rates of kidney aging contributes to the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the human aging process. Although family studies have shown that play a role in longevity, it has proven difficult to identify the specific genetic variants involved, until now.

The researchers, led by Dr. Stuart Kim, first used genome-wide transcriptional profiling to determine that 630 genes change expression with age in . Next, they determined that 101 of these age-regulated genes contain DNA variations among individuals that associate with level. These 101 genes were tested for association with kidney aging in a combined analysis of two populations selected to study normal aging: the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging and the InCHIANTI Study. One gene that encodes an extracellular matrix protein (MMP20) was revealed to be significantly associated with kidney aging, providing the first gene association with kidney aging.

Because data from both populations were combined in the kidney aging association analysis, the researchers stress that this finding needs to be replicated in additional populations. As more aging genes are discovered and confirmed, the particular genetic variants belonging to a person could one day be combined to better predict the aging trajectory of the kidney.

More information: Wheeler HE, Metter EJ, Tanaka T, Absher D, Higgins J, et al. (2009) Sequential Use of Transcriptional Profiling, Expression Quantitative Trait Mapping, and Gene Association Implicates MMP20 in Human Kidney Aging. PLoS Genet 5(10): e1000685. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1000685

Source: Public Library of Science (news : web)

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Association found between abnormal cerebral connectivity and variability in the PPARG gene in developing preterm infants

December 12, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—A team of researchers with King's College London and the National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre, both in the U.K., has found what they describe as a strong association between ...

Large genetic study links tendency to undervalue future rewards with ADHD, obesity

December 11, 2017
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have found a genetic signature for delay discounting—the tendency to undervalue future rewards—that overlaps with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder ...

Gene variants identified that may influence sexual orientation in men and boys

December 8, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—A large team of researchers from several institutions in the U.S. and one each from Australia and the U.K. has found two gene variants that appear to be more prevalent in gay men than straight men, adding ...

Disease caused by reduction of most abundant cellular protein identified

December 8, 2017
An international team of scientists and doctors has identified a new disease that results in low levels of a common protein found inside our cells.

Study finds genetic mutation causes 'vicious cycle' in most common form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

December 8, 2017
University of Michigan-led research brings scientists one step closer to understanding the development of neurodegenerative disorders such as ALS.

Mutations in neurons accumulate as we age: The process may explain normal cognitive decline and neurodegeneration

December 7, 2017
Scientists have wondered whether somatic (non-inherited) mutations play a role in aging and brain degeneration, but until recently there was no good technology to test this idea. A study published online today in Science, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.