Bone marrow transplantation may increase cancer resistance in patients

August 24, 2011, University of Kentucky

Bone marrow transplantation with genetically modified cells may prolong the period of cancer-free survival, suggests a study led by Dr. Vivek Rangnekar, associate director of translational research for the Markey Cancer Center at the University of Kentucky.

Bone marrow, a spongy tissue inside bones, contains that produce , including leukocytes, erythrocytes and . In the cover story of the July issue of Cancer Biology & Therapy, Rangnekar and his team explore the transfer of bone marrow from Par-4/SAC-transgenic donor mice to control mice as a means of transferring anti-cancer potential.

Bone marrow transplantation with genetically modified cells may prolong the period of disease-free survival for cancer patients, suggests a study led by Dr. Vivek Rangnekar, associate director of translational research at the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center. In the cover story of the July issue of Cancer Biology & Therapy, Rangnekar and his team explore the transfer of bone marrow from Par-4/SAC-transgenic donor mice to control mice as a means of transferring anticancer potential. Here, Dr. Rangnekar discusses his latest study and its implication for future research and cancer patients. Credit: University of Kentucky

Par-4 (also known as PAWR) is a tumor suppressor protein that selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells, but not normal cells. This function of Par-4 is mediated by its central core domain, SAC. SAC-transgenic mice are resistant to the growth of spontaneous and inducible tumors.

After transplantation, the researchers discovered the expression of cancer-killer SAC-GFP activity in marrow cells of the recipient mice, implying the successful transfer and colonization of the anti-cancer tissue from the donors. In addition, soluble Par-4 or SAC protein injected into mice inhibited the growth of metastatic tumors.

Rangnekar, the Alfred Cohen Endowed Chair of Oncology Research at Markey, says the study shows promise for treating both primary and metastatic tumors.

"We are excited by the findings of this study as they indicate that secreted Par-4 is systemically active in mice," Rangnekar said. "Optimization of the procedure using stem cells that are genetically modified to systemically secrete potent protein payloads of Par-4/SAC killer activity may offer a new approach to treat not only primary tumors but also metastatic tumors of diverse origin."

Related Stories

Recommended for you

New approach attacks 'undruggable' cancers from the outside in

January 23, 2018
Cancer researchers have made great strides in developing targeted therapies that treat the specific genetic mutations underlying a patient's cancer. However, many of the most common cancer-causing genes are so central to ...

Scientists block the siren call of two aggressive cancers

January 23, 2018
Aggressive cancers like glioblastoma and metastatic breast cancer have in common a siren call that beckons the bone marrow to send along whatever the tumors need to survive and thrive.

Study: Cells of three advanced cancers die with drug-like compounds that reverse chemo failure

January 23, 2018
Researchers at Southern Methodist University have discovered three drug-like compounds that successfully reverse chemotherapy failure in three of the most commonly aggressive cancers—ovarian, prostate and breast.

'Hijacker' drives cancer in some patients with high-risk neuroblastoma

January 23, 2018
Researchers have identified mechanisms that drive about 10 percent of high-risk neuroblastoma cases and have used a new approach to show how the cancer genome "hijacks" DNA that regulates other genes. The resulting insights ...

Enzyme inhibitor combined with chemotherapy delays glioblastoma growth

January 23, 2018
In animal experiments, a human-derived glioblastoma significantly regressed when treated with the combination of an experimental enzyme inhibitor and the standard glioblastoma chemotherapy drug, temozolomide.

Researchers identify a protein that keeps metastatic breast cancer cells dormant

January 23, 2018
A study headed by ICREA researcher Roger Gomis at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) has identified the genes involved in the latent asymptomatic state of breast cancer metastases. The work sheds light ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.