Foods rich in protein, dairy products help dieters preserve muscle and lose belly fat: study

August 29, 2011

New research suggests a higher-protein, lower-carbohydrate energy-restricted diet has a major positive impact on body composition, trimming belly fat and increasing lean muscle, particularly when the proteins come from dairy products.

The study, published in the September issue of the Journal of Nutrition, compared three groups of overweight and obese, but otherwise healthy, . Each consumed either low, medium or high amounts of dairy foods coupled with higher or lower amounts of protein and carbohydrates.

The women exercised seven days per week for four months, a routine that included five days of and two days of circuit weightlifting.

According to the researchers, there were identical total weight losses among the groups, but the higher-protein, high-dairy group experienced greater whole-body fat and abdomen fat losses, greater lean mass gains and greater increases in strength.

The tissue composition, exclusively fat, of the weight the women lost has for longer-term health, say the researchers.

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"One hundred per cent of the weight lost in the higher-protein, high-dairy group was fat. And the participants gained , which is a major change in ," says Andrea Josse, lead author of the study and a graduate student in the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University. "The preservation or even gain of muscle is very important for maintaining and preventing weight regain, which can be major problem for many seeking to lose weight."

Researchers found the lower-protein, low-dairy group lost about a pound and half of muscle whereas the lower-protein, medium dairy group lost almost no muscle. In marked contrast, the higher-protein, high-dairy group actually gained a pound and half of muscle, representing a three-pound difference between the low- and high-dairy groups.

On top of the muscle mass differences, the higher-protein, high-dairy group lost twice as much belly fat than the lower-protein, low-dairy group.

"Fat in the abdomen is thought to be especially bad for cardiovascular and metabolic health, and it seems—according to what we found in this study—increasing calcium and protein in the diet may help to further promote loss of fat from the worst storage area in the body," says Josse.

"A very important point is that these changes were not captured by simple measures of body weight or body mass index, which are the most commonly used measures of dietary 'success'" adds Stuart Phillips, a professor in the Department of . "These women also got fitter and stronger, which greatly reduces their risk of disease."

Explore further: Protein preserves muscle and physical function in dieting postmenopausal women

More information: jn.nutrition.org/content/141/9/1626.full

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tjcoop3
not rated yet Aug 30, 2011
Gee Atkins was right after all. Just remember to stay away from the low fat dairy products as they are higher in Carbs (read sugar) and will cause fat gain.
Former Quacks becoming Geniuses everyday as science continues to reveal that the silly things that medicine once taught and believed as fact were in fact the very cause of the deaths of millions.
Stay tuned folks as more medical ignorance and arrogance is exposed for what it is and more lives are saved because of it.
Eat Meat. Eat Dairy Eat Fat Eat Veggies and Fruits Avoid GMO's and...

If it's the Government or funded by it and their mouth is movin' they're probably lyin'.

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