Blocking inflammation could lead to tailored medical treatments

September 19, 2011, University of Calgary

By using a mouse model of inflammation researchers at the University of Calgary have discovered a new class of molecules that can inhibit the recruitment of some white blood cells to sites of inflammation in the body. A provisional patent has been filed on these molecules by Innovates Calgary.

When there is inflammation in the body, one of the primary defense mechanisms is the movement of , known as neutrophils, from the bloodstream into the infected tissue. Neutrophils are specialized cells that kill microbes associated with infection. Although neutrophils are important, their excessive recruitment into tissues can result in damage and contribute to disease.

Current anti-inflammatory drugs block all inflammation in the body. However, these newly discovered molecules target only neutrophils and may offer a more tailored course of treatment for some diseases, for example to help people suffering from such as (IBD).

"This class of novel anti-inflammatory agents set the stage to develop drugs for conditions that have recurrent or chronic inflammation, " says Stephen Robbins, Ph.D, a researcher at the University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine, senior study author and the Director of the Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute. "The next step in our research will be to test their effectiveness in preclinical studies of inflammatory diseases, including IBD"

"We are excited by the possibility that this research may be clinically useful to alleviate some of the damage that occurs in conditions where leads to tissue injury," says Elizabeth Long PhD, who is also a University of Calgary researcher and study author.

The study was published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS).

Explore further: Rogue blood cells may contribute to post-surgery organ damage

Related Stories

Rogue blood cells may contribute to post-surgery organ damage

June 26, 2011
A study from scientists at Queen Mary, University of London, sheds new light on why people who experience serious trauma or go through major surgery, can suffer organ damage in parts of the body which are seemingly unconnected ...

Recommended for you

Magnetically applied MicroRNAs could one day help relieve constipation

January 17, 2018
Constipation is an underestimated and debilitating medical issue related to the opioid epidemic. As a growing concern, researchers look to new tools to help patients with this side effect of opioid use and aging.

Researchers devise decoy molecule to block pain where it starts

January 16, 2018
For anyone who has accidentally injured themselves, Dr. Zachary Campbell not only sympathizes, he's developing new ways to blunt pain.

Scientists unleash power of genetic data to identify disease risk

January 16, 2018
Massive banks of genetic information are being harnessed to shed new light on modifiable health risks that underlie common diseases.

Blood-vessel-on-a-chip provides insight into new anti-inflammatory drug candidate

January 15, 2018
One of the most important and fraught processes in the human body is inflammation. Inflammatory responses to injury or disease are crucial for recruiting the immune system to help the body heal, but inflammation can also ...

Molecule produced by fat cells reduces obesity and diabetes in mice

January 15, 2018
UC San Francisco researchers have discovered a new biological pathway in fat cells that could explain why some people with obesity are at high risk for metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes. The new findings—demonstrated ...

Obese fat becomes inflamed and scarred, which may make weight loss harder

January 12, 2018
The fat of obese people becomes distressed, scarred and inflamed, which can make weight loss more difficult, research at the University of Exeter has found.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.