Transneuronal spread model fits neurodegenerative disease

March 24, 2012
Transneuronal spread model fits neurodegenerative disease
Neurodegenerative diseases may be characterized by specific regions of the brain that are critical network epicenters, with disease-related vulnerability associated with shorter paths to the epicenter and greater total connectional flow, according to a study published in the March 22 issue of Neuron.

(HealthDay) -- Neurodegenerative diseases may be characterized by specific regions of the brain that are critical network epicenters, with disease-related vulnerability associated with shorter paths to the epicenter and greater total connectional flow, according to a study published in the March 22 issue of Neuron.

To investigate how intrinsic connectivity in health predicts regional vulnerability to neurodegenerative disease, Juan Zhou, Ph.D., from the University of California in San Francisco, and colleagues used task-free functional to identify the healthy intrinsic connectivity patterns seeded by brain regions vulnerable to five neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's disease, behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia, , progressive nonfluent aphasia, and corticobasal syndrome).

The investigators found that, for each neurodegenerative disease, specific regions emerged as critical network epicenters, and their normal connectivity profile was most similar to the disease-linked pattern of atrophy. In healthy subjects, greater disease-related vulnerability was consistently associated with regions with shorter functional paths to the epicenters and also with higher total connectional flow.

"These findings best fit a transneuronal spread model of network-based vulnerability. Molecular pathological approaches may help clarify what makes each epicenter vulnerable to its targeting disease and how species travel between networked brain structures," the authors write.

Explore further: Alzheimer's disease spreads through linked nerve cells, brain imaging studies suggest

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Alzheimer's disease spreads through linked nerve cells, brain imaging studies suggest

March 21, 2012
Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia may spread within nerve networks in the brain by moving directly between connected neurons, instead of in other ways proposed by scientists, such as by propagating in all directions, ...

Changes in brain function in early HIV infection: A reliable indicator of disease prognosis?

October 6, 2011
Measurable changes in brain function and communication between brain regions may be a consequence of virus-induced injury during the early stages of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. These abnormalities and their ...

Autism risk gene linked to differences in brain structure

March 21, 2012
Healthy individuals who carry a gene variation linked to an increased risk of autism have structural differences in their brains that may help explain how the gene affects brain function and increases vulnerability for autism. ...

Study reveals new link between Alzheimer's disease and healthy aging

August 15, 2011
Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) are two of the most prevalent forms of neurodegenerative disorders. In a study published online today in Genome Research, researchers have analyzed changes ...

Recommended for you

How your brain remembers what you had for dinner last night

January 17, 2018
Confirming earlier computational models, researchers at University of California San Diego and UC San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Arizona and Louisiana, report that episodic memories are encoded in the hippocampus ...

Recording a thought's fleeting trip through the brain

January 17, 2018
University of California, Berkeley neuroscientists have tracked the progress of a thought through the brain, showing clearly how the prefrontal cortex at the front of the brain coordinates activity to help us act in response ...

Midbrain 'start neurons' control whether we walk or run

January 17, 2018
Locomotion comprises the most fundamental movements we perform. It is a complex sequence from initiating the first step, to stopping when we reach our goal. At the same time, locomotion is executed at different speeds to ...

A 'touching sight': How babies' brains process touch builds foundations for learning

January 16, 2018
Touch is the first of the five senses to develop, yet scientists know far less about the baby's brain response to touch than to, say, the sight of mom's face, or the sound of her voice.

Brain zaps may help curb tics of Tourette syndrome

January 16, 2018
Electric zaps can help rewire the brains of Tourette syndrome patients, effectively reducing their uncontrollable vocal and motor tics, a new study shows.

Researchers identify protein involved in cocaine addiction

January 16, 2018
Mount Sinai researchers have identified a protein produced by the immune system—granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)—that could be responsible for the development of cocaine addiction.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.