T cells key in atherosclerosis-linked inflammation

August 22, 2012
T cells key in atherosclerosis-linked inflammation
In a mouse model of atherosclerosis, CD4+ T cells interact with antigen-presenting cells in the presence of cognate antigen, leading to cell activation and proliferation and the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, according to an experimental study published online Aug. 13 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

(HealthDay) -- In a mouse model of atherosclerosis, CD4+ T cells interact with antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the presence of cognate antigen, leading to cell activation and proliferation and the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, according to an experimental study published online Aug. 13 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Ekaterina K. Koltsova, M.D., Ph.D., of the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology in California, and colleagues compared the behavior and role of APCs in normal and atherosclerotic mice using live- of explanted aortas.

The researchers found that, in the presence, but not the absence, of cognate antigen, CD4+ T cells were able to interact with fluorescently labeled APCs in the aortic wall. In atherosclerosis-prone mice, APCs interacted with CD4+ T cells in the aorta, which resulted in cell activation and proliferation and the secretion of cytokines (interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α). Uptake of oxidized and minimally modified low-density lipoproteins was enhanced by these cytokines.

"We conclude that antigen presentation by APCs to CD4+ T cells in the arterial wall causes local T-cell activation and production of proinflammatory cytokines, which promote atherosclerosis by maintaining chronic inflammation and inducing foam cell formation," the authors write.

Explore further: A vaccine for heart disease? New discovery points up this possibility

More information: Abstract
Full Text

Related Stories

A vaccine for heart disease? New discovery points up this possibility

August 14, 2012
Most people probably know that heart disease remains the nation's No. 1 killer. But what many may be surprised to learn is that cholesterol has a major accomplice in causing dangerous arterial plaque buildup that can trigger ...

Discovery of immune cells that protect against multiple sclerosis offers hope for new treatment

August 16, 2012
In multiple sclerosis, the immune system attacks nerves in the brain and spinal cord, causing movement problems, muscle weakness and loss of vision. Immune cells called dendritic cells, which were previously thought to contribute ...

How excess alcohol depresses immune function

August 16, 2011
Alcoholism suppresses the immune system, resulting in a high risk of serious, and even life-threatening infections. A new study shows that this effect stems largely from alcohol’s toxicity to immune system cells called ...

New memory for HIV patients

March 26, 2012
The hallmark loss of helper CD4+ T cells during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection may be a red herring for therapeutics, according to a study published on March 26th in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Recommended for you

Want to win at sports? Take a cue from these mighty mice

July 20, 2017
As student athletes hit training fields this summer to gain the competitive edge, a new study shows how the experiences of a tiny mouse can put them on the path to winning.

'Smart' robot technology could give stroke rehab a boost

July 19, 2017
Scientists say they have developed a "smart" robotic harness that might make it easier for people to learn to walk again after a stroke or spinal cord injury.

Engineered liver tissue expands after transplant

July 19, 2017
Many diseases, including cirrhosis and hepatitis, can lead to liver failure. More than 17,000 Americans suffering from these diseases are now waiting for liver transplants, but significantly fewer livers are available.

Lunatic Fringe gene plays key role in the renewable brain

July 19, 2017
The discovery that the brain can generate new cells - about 700 new neurons each day - has triggered investigations to uncover how this process is regulated. Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Jan and Dan Duncan ...

New animal models for hepatitis C could pave the way for a vaccine

July 19, 2017
They say that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. In the case of hepatitis C—a disease that affects nearly 71 million people worldwide, causing cirrhosis and liver cancer if left untreated—it might be worth ...

Omega-3 fatty acids fight inflammation via cannabinoids

July 18, 2017
Chemical compounds called cannabinoids are found in marijuana and also are produced naturally in the body from omega-3 fatty acids. A well-known cannabinoid in marijuana, tetrahydrocannabinol, is responsible for some of its ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.