Psoriasis patients at high risk of diabetes

August 27, 2012

Patients with psoriasis are at high risk of new-onset diabetes mellitus, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2012. The findings were presented at the press conference by Dr Ole Ahlehoff from Copenhagen University Hospital, Gentofte, Denmark and at the scientific session by Usman KHALID.

Psoriasis is a common that affects approximately 125 million people worldwide. A new study of the entire Danish population confirms previous reports of of diabetes mellitus in with psoriasis and shows that risk increases with severity of psoriasis.

Psoriasis, , and early steps in the development of diabetes mellitus are characterised by , i.e. a chronic state of alert. "This chronic state of alert may explain the increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus seen in these patients," said Dr Ahlehoff.

The study comprised more than 4 million people, including approximately 50,000 patients with psoriasis, who were followed for 13 years.

The overall rates of new-onset diabetes mellitus per 1,000 observational years were 3.67 (CI=3.65-3.69) in the reference population who did not have psoriasis, 6.93 (CI=6.63-7.25) for patients with mild psoriasis and 9.65 (CI=8.68-10.73) for patients with severe psoriasis.

The risk of new-onset diabetes mellitus was increased in all patients with psoriasis compared to people who did not have psoriasis. Risk increased with the severity of psoriasis. Compared to people without psoriasis, patients with mild psoriasis were 1.5 times more likely to acquire new-onset diabetes mellitus [rate ratio (RR)=1.49; CI=1.43-1.56] and patients with severe psoriasis were more than twice as likely [RR=2.13; CI=1.91-2.37].

The results remained significant after adjustment for potential confounders, including age, sex, , use of medication, and comorbidity.

Dr Ahlehoff said: "The major conclusion of the study was that psoriasis was associated with increased risk of diabetes mellitus and the risk was highest in patients with severe psoriasis."

"The results add to current evidence of increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease in patients with psoriasis," he added. "More needs to be done to increase awareness in this large group of patients on what steps they can take to decrease their risk factors for cardiovascular disease."

Dr Ahlehoff continued: "Studies are urgently required to examine the impact of aggressive treatment on cardiometabolic outcomes."

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Tom_Hennessy
1 / 5 (1) Aug 27, 2012
Could it be the increased iron in the body ?

"Role of free reactive iron in psoriasis"

The government , NIH, is presently conducting a study of Iron Depletion For Type 2 Diabetes and NAFLD.
"Iron Depletion Therapy for Type 2 DM and NAFLD"

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