Running too far, too fast, and too long speeds progress 'to finish line of life'

November 29, 2012

Vigorous exercise is good for health, but only if it's limited to a maximum daily dose of between 30 and 50 minutes, say researchers in an editorial published online in Heart.

The idea that more and more high , such as marathons, can only do you good, is a myth say the US cardiologists, and the evidence shows that it's likely to more harm than good to your heart.

"If you really want to do a marathon or full distance triathlon, etc, it may be best to do just one or a few and then proceed to safer and healthier exercise patterns," they warn.

"A routine of will add life to your years as well as years to your life. In contrast, running too far, too fast, and for too many years may speed one's progress to towards the finishing line of life."

Explore further: 'Exergames' not perfect, but can lead to more exercise

More information: Run for your life... at a comfortable speed and not too far Online First doi 10.1136//heartjrnl-2012-302886

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2 comments

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ziphead
3.7 / 5 (3) Nov 29, 2012
Why oh why can't common sense just... prevail?
tekram
5 / 5 (2) Nov 30, 2012
Only 0.5% of the population has run a marathon and the percentage that routinely participate in endurance sports is probably only 0.1%. So most people do not have this problem.

On the other hand the frequency of obesity in the US is close to 40%.

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