In oropharyngeal cancer, HPV status impacts distant mets risk

January 14, 2013
In oropharyngeal cancer, HPV status impacts distant mets risk
In patients with oropharyngeal cancer, human papillomavirus status and T and N staging categories affect the rate of distant control and may help identify candidates for treatment deintensification strategies, according to research published online Jan. 7 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(HealthDay)—In patients with oropharyngeal cancer (OPC), human papillomavirus (HPV) status and T and N staging categories affect the rate of distant control (DC) and may help identify candidates for treatment deintensification strategies, according to research published online Jan. 7 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Brian O'Sullivan, M.D., of the Princess Margaret Hospital/University of Toronto, and colleagues conducted a study involving 899 patients with OPC to identify patients with HPV-associated OPC who would be suitable for treatment deintensification strategies, that omit chemotherapy, based on their having a low risk of distant metastasis (DM).

Of the cohort, HPV status was ascertained for 505 patients, of which 382 were HPV-positive and 123 HPV-negative. During a median follow-up of 3.9 years, the researchers found that HPV-positive patients had significantly higher local and regional control but similar DC, compared with HPV-negative patients. HPV negativity, N2b-N3, T4, and alone were predictive of lower recurrence-free survival. HPV-positive patients were classified according to whether their risk of DM was low (T1-3N0-2c; DC, 93 percent) or high (N3 or T4; DC, 76 percent). HPV-negative patients were also classified into low (T1-2N0-2c; DC, 93 percent) and high DM risk (T3-4N3; DC, 72 percent) groups. In the HPV-positive, low-risk N2c subset, the DC rate was lower with treatment by alone (73 versus 92 percent for chemoradiotherapy).

"The of T and N categories on DM risk seems to be different for HPV-positive versus HPV-negative patients," the authors write. "A deintensification philosophy might be most optimally deployed in such subgroups with the least likelihood of DM."

Explore further: HPV improves survival for African-Americans with throat cancer

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Related Stories

HPV improves survival for African-Americans with throat cancer

July 19, 2012
Even though the human papillomavirus (HPV) is a risk factor for certain head and neck cancers, its presence could make all the difference in terms of survival, especially for African Americans with throat cancer, say Henry ...

Periodontitis linked to HPV-positive head, neck tumors

June 20, 2012
(HealthDay) -- For patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) there is an increased risk of human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive tumors among those with a history of periodontitis, according to a study published ...

HPV test for oral cancers may improve patient outcomes, facilitate targeted therapy

November 5, 2012
(Medical Xpress)—A new test designed to classify tonsil and throat cancers into one of two groups should help deliver the right treatment to the right patients, according to research being presented at the NCRI Cancer Conference ...

Study examines chronic inflammation in oral cavity and HPV status of head and neck cancers

June 18, 2012
Among patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, a history of chronic inflammation in the mouth (periodontitis, i.e. gum disease) may be associated with an increased risk of tumors positive for human papillomavirus ...

Recommended for you

Scientists develop blood test that spots tumor-derived DNA in people with early-stage cancers

August 16, 2017
In a bid to detect cancers early and in a noninvasive way, scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report they have developed a test that spots tiny amounts of cancer-specific DNA in blood and have used it to ...

Toxic formaldehyde is produced inside our own cells, scientists discover

August 16, 2017
New research has revealed that some of the toxin formaldehyde in our bodies does not come from our environment - it is a by-product of an essential reaction inside our own cells. This could provide new targets for developing ...

Cell cycle-blocking drugs can shrink tumors by enlisting immune system in attack on cancer

August 16, 2017
In the brief time that drugs known as CDK4/6 inhibitors have been approved for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer, doctors have made a startling observation: in certain patients, the drugs—designed to halt cancer ...

Researchers find 'switch' that turns on immune cells' tumor-killing ability

August 16, 2017
Molecular biologists led by Leonid Pobezinsky and his wife and research collaborator Elena Pobezinskaya at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have published results that for the first time show how a microRNA molecule ...

Popular immunotherapy target turns out to have a surprising buddy

August 16, 2017
The majority of current cancer immunotherapies focus on PD-L1. This well studied protein turns out to be controlled by a partner, CMTM6, a previously unexplored molecule that is now suddenly also a potential therapeutic target. ...

A metabolic treatment for pancreatic cancer?

August 15, 2017
Pancreatic cancer is now the third leading cause of cancer mortality. Its incidence is increasing in parallel with the population increase in obesity, and its five-year survival rate still hovers at just 8 to 9 percent. Research ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.