Grape polyphenols counteract fructose-induced effects

February 4, 2013
Grape polyphenols counteract fructose-induced effects
Grape polyphenol supplementation prevents fructose-induced oxidative stress and insulin resistance in healthy volunteers with high metabolic risk, according to research published online Dec. 28 in Diabetes Care.

(HealthDay)—Grape polyphenol (PP) supplementation prevents fructose-induced oxidative stress and insulin resistance in healthy volunteers with high metabolic risk, according to research published online Dec. 28 in Diabetes Care.

Marie Hokayem, of the University of Montpellier in France, and colleagues conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to study the efficacy of grape PP supplementation in counteracting the metabolic changes that occur with a high-fructose diet, specifically oxidative stress and (IR), in 38 healthy overweight/ with first-degree family members with type 2 diabetes.

The researchers found that, when given fructose, placebo-treated patients experienced a 20 percent reduction in hepatic index, an 11 percent reduction in glucose infusion rate, an increase in systemic and muscle oxidative stress, and a downregulation of and decreased mitochondrial respiration. None of these deleterious effects of fructose were reported in those who received grape PP supplementation.

"In conclusion, nine weeks of grape PP supplementation secures an unwavering metabolic state in healthy overweight/obese first-degree relatives of type 2 diabetic subjects faced with a six-day fructose overload, preventing liver and muscle IR while bearing no adverse effects," the authors write. "Future studies should investigate the effects of grape PP coadministration with processed food rich in fructose and their potential role in counteracting the metabolic syndrome."

Explore further: Study offers insight to how fructose causes obesity, metabolic syndrome

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Study offers insight to how fructose causes obesity, metabolic syndrome

February 27, 2012
A group of scientists from across the world have come together in a just-published study that provides new insights into how fructose causes obesity and metabolic syndrome, more commonly known as diabetes.

Imaging study examines effect of fructose on brain regions that regulate appetite

January 1, 2013
In a study examining possible factors regarding the associations between fructose consumption and weight gain, brain magnetic resonance imaging of study participants indicated that ingestion of glucose but not fructose reduced ...

Increased dietary fructose linked to elevated uric acid levels and lower liver energy stores

September 13, 2012
Obese patients with type 2 diabetes who consume higher amounts of fructose display reduced levels of liver adenosine triphosphate (ATP)—a compound involved in the energy transfer between cells. The findings, published in ...

Recommended for you

Scientists discover a new way to treat type 2 diabetes

July 21, 2017
Medication currently being used to treat obesity is also proving to have significant health benefits for patients with type 2 diabetes. A new study published today in Molecular Metabolism explains how this therapeutic benefit ...

Alzheimer's drug cuts hallmark inflammation related to metabolic syndrome by 25 percent

July 20, 2017
An existing Alzheimer's medication slashes inflammation and insulin resistance in patients with metabolic syndrome, a potential therapeutic intervention for a highly dangerous condition affecting 30 percent of adults in the ...

Diabetes or its precursor affects 100 million Americans

July 19, 2017
Almost one-third of the US population—100 million people—either has diabetes or its precursor condition, known as pre-diabetes, said a government report Tuesday.

One virus may protect against type 1 diabetes, others may increase risk

July 11, 2017
Doctors can't predict who will develop type 1 diabetes, a chronic autoimmune disease in which the immune system destroys the cells needed to control blood-sugar levels, requiring daily insulin injections and continual monitoring.

Diabetes complications are a risk factor for repeat hospitalizations, study shows

July 7, 2017
For patients with diabetes, one reason for hospitalization and unplanned hospital readmission is severe dysglycemia (uncontrolled hyperglycemia - high blood sugar, or hypoglycemia - low blood sugar), says new research published ...

Researchers identify promising target to protect bone in patients with diabetes

July 7, 2017
Utilizing metabolomics research techniques, NYU Dentistry researchers investigated the underlying biochemical activity and signaling within the bone marrow of hyperglycemic mice with hopes of reducing fracture risks of diabetics

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.