New obesity, height genes identified

April 8, 2013

(Medical Xpress)—Busselton residents and researchers from The University of Western Australia have helped a worldwide scientific collaboration identify new genes associated with height and obesity.

The discovery of four new loci (the specific place on a chromosome where a gene is located) affecting height and seven related to obesity is described in a paper published online today in Nature Genetics.

The paper was authored by more than 300 researchers and is the result of a meta-analysis of dozens of studies around the world collating data from more than 263,000 individuals of European background.

UWA contributors included Research Assistant Professor Gemma Cadby of the Centre for of Health and Disease, who provided analysis of height and weight data from the long-running Busselton .

Dr Cadby said the newly discovered genes represented further pieces in the puzzle as researchers sought to understand the to height and weight.

"They already know of some genes likely to affect height and weight, but these genes only explain a limited amount of the contribution of genetics to these traits," Dr Cadby said. "So a lot of genes still need to be identified, but this is an important step.

"The ultimate goal for is to further the understanding of human diseases and in doing so, to develop new treatments and ways of preventing disease. Actually translating the results of studies such as this into providing intervention, management and treatments for people who are obese is a long way ahead, but in order to do those things you need to understand the genetics of the disease. We have to get this bit of the puzzle before we can move to the next step."

The paper is titled "Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into ."

Explore further: Genetic clues for type 2 diabetes

Related Stories

Genetic clues for type 2 diabetes

August 14, 2012
Busselton residents and researchers from The University of Western Australia have contributed to a worldwide scientific collaboration that has identified new genetic links in the quest to map the biological pathways that ...

Largest-ever genome-wide study identifies genes for common childhood obesity

April 8, 2012
Genetics researchers have identified at least two new gene variants that increase the risk of common childhood obesity.

Recommended for you

Science Says: DNA test results may not change health habits

August 17, 2017
If you learned your DNA made you more susceptible to getting a disease, wouldn't you work to stay healthy?

Phenotype varies for presumed pathogenic variants in KCNB1

August 16, 2017
(HealthDay)—De novo KCNB1 missense and loss-of-function variants are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, with or without seizures, according to a study published online Aug. 14 in JAMA Neurology.

Genetic variants found to play key role in human immune system

August 16, 2017
It is widely recognized that people respond differently to infections. This can partially be explained by genetics, shows a new study published today in Nature Communications by an international collaboration of researchers ...

Active non-coding DNA might help pinpoint genetic risk for psychiatric disorders

August 16, 2017
Northwestern Medicine scientists have demonstrated a new method of analyzing non-coding regions of DNA in neurons, which may help to pinpoint which genetic variants are most important to the development of schizophrenia and ...

Evolved masculine and feminine behaviors can be inherited from social environment

August 15, 2017
The different ways men and women behave, passed down from generation to generation, can be inherited from our social environment - not just from genes, experts have suggested.

Attitudes on human genome editing vary, but all agree conversation is necessary

August 10, 2017
In early August 2017, an international team of scientists announced they had successfully edited the DNA of human embryos. As people process the political, moral and regulatory issues of the technology—which nudges us closer ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.