Discectomy post-op pain worse in patients with retrolisthesis

May 16, 2013
Discectomy post-op pain worse in patients with retrolisthesis
The presence of retrolisthesis in patients undergoing decompressive surgery for a lumbar disc herniation may result in significantly worse lower back pain and physical function over four years, according to a study published in the April issue of The Spine Journal.

(HealthDay)—The presence of retrolisthesis in patients undergoing decompressive surgery for a lumbar disc herniation may result in significantly worse lower back pain and physical function over four years, according to a study published in the April issue of The Spine Journal.

Kevin K. Kang, M.D., of the Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., and colleagues used data from the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial for a cross-sectional study of 125 patients, 29 with retrolisthesis, who underwent L5-S1 discectomy and had a complete scan to review. The authors analyzed average patient scores over four years on the Short Form (SF)-36 bodily pain scale, SF-36 scale on physical function, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Sciatica Bothersomeness Index (SBI).

Using longitudinal regression models, the researchers found that postoperative bodily pain and physical function became worse in patients with retrolisthesis (posterior subluxation of 8 percent or more). However, the study showed no differences in ODI or SBI scores in the patient groups, and retrolisthesis had little effect on operative time, blood loss, lengths of stay, complications, rate of additional spine surgeries, or recurrent disc herniations.

"Although retrolisthesis in patients with L5-S1 disc herniation did not affect the baseline pain or function, postoperative outcomes appeared to be somewhat worse," the authors write. "It is possible that the contribution of pain or dysfunction related to retrolisthesis became more evident after removal of the disc herniation."

Several authors disclosed to the biotechnology and medical device industries.

Explore further: Lumbar disc herniation surgery is effective for octogenarians

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Lumbar disc herniation surgery is effective for octogenarians

April 8, 2013
(HealthDay)—For octogenarian patients with lumbar disc herniation, unilateral laminectomy and discectomy seems safe and effective, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders and ...

Study finds poorer outcomes for obese patients treated for lumbar disc herniation

January 10, 2013
While obese patients are more likely to have surgical treatment for lumbar disc herniation – a slipped or ruptured disc – than nonobese patients, obesity increases operative time, blood loss and length of hospital stay, ...

Review supports fusion for disc-related chronic low back pain

April 10, 2013
(HealthDay)—Clinical outcomes are positive for patients with chronic low back pain due to degenerative disc disease who undergo lumbar fusion, according to a review published in the April 1 issue of Spine.

Improved driving reaction times after lumbar disc sx

January 15, 2013
(HealthDay)—Driving reaction times (DRTs), which are increased for patients with radiculopathy, improve after lumbar disc surgery, according to a study published in the November issue of the European Spine Journal.

Surgery center influences outcomes in spinal surgery

October 26, 2012
(HealthDay)—Choice of surgery center affects patient outcomes following surgery for lumbar stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis, according to research published online Oct. 17 in Spine.

Less benefit for obese with lumbar disc herniation tx

February 8, 2013
(HealthDay)—Obese patients derive less benefit from both operative and non-operative lumbar disc herniation treatment, according to a study published in the Jan. 2 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Recommended for you

Four simple tests could help GPs spot pneumonia and reduce unnecessary antibiotics

November 23, 2017
Testing for fever, high pulse rate, crackly breath sounds, and low oxygen levels could be key to helping GPs distinguish pneumonia from less serious infections, according to a large study published in the European Respiratory ...

New approach to tracking how deadly 'superbugs' travel could slow their spread

November 22, 2017
Killer bacteria - ones that have out-evolved our best antibiotics—may not go away anytime soon. But a new approach to tracking their spread could eventually give us a fighting chance to keep their death toll down.

Research points to diagnostic test for top cause of liver transplant in kids

November 22, 2017
Biliary atresia is the most common cause of liver transplants for children in the United States. Now researchers report in Science Translational Medicine finding a strong biomarker candidate that could be used for earlier ...

Metabolites altered in chronic kidney disease

November 22, 2017
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects 1 in 7 people in the United States, according to the U.S. National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). These individuals have a very high risk of cardiovascular ...

Rainfall can indicate that mosquito-borne epidemics will occur weeks later

November 22, 2017
A new study demonstrates that outbreaks of mosquito-borne viruses Zika and Chikungunya generally occur about three weeks after heavy rainfall.Researchers also found that Chikungunya will predominate over Zika when both circulate ...

Alcohol consumption and metabolic factors act together to increase the risk of severe liver disease

November 22, 2017
A new study provides insights into the interaction between alcohol consumption and metabolic factors in predicting severe liver disease in the general population. The findings, which are published in Hepatology, indicate ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.