Antibody engineering know-how

June 5, 2013
Antibody engineering know-how
Credit: IgG and engineered recombinant antibody fragments

(Medical Xpress)—Antibodies are of enormous value to society as therapeutic and diagnostic agents. There are many scientists worldwide interested in producing their own novel engineered antibody based molecules as part of their research work.

Scientists from UCD Conway Institute and UCD Centre have published an accessible instruction manual detailing how to make antigen binding molecules for molecular studies and translational research.

This protocol published in the journal Nature Protocols describes the design and development of recombinant antigen-binding molecules from through rapid identification and cloning of variable genes.

Describing the work, Conway scientist Dr David O'Connell said, "The protocol is accessible for groups not specialised in this area, and allows them to carry out reverse engineering of functional, recombinant antigen-binding molecules from hybridomas within 50 working days.

We are delighted with this publication and view it an endorsement by a prestigious scientific journal of our experience in the engineering of . It reflects our capabilities in antibody design, construction and characterisation that are made possible through the excellent infrastructure available on the university campus."

This research reflects a successful collaboration between UCD scientists with CRO Genscript Inc. The team, which also includes Conway Fellow, Professor Gil Lee hopes to attract new collaborators with both industry and academia on foot of this work.

Explore further: New stable antibodies created

More information: Nat Protoc. 2013 May 16;8(6):1125-48. doi: 10.1038/nprot.2013.057. Epub 2013 May 16.

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