Clinical trial results for cancer drugs often not published

July 23, 2013
Clinical trial results for cancer drugs often not published
Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act requires publication of the results of completed trials of cancer drugs conducted in the United States, results for almost half of the studies have not been made publicly available three years later, according to research published online July 22 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(HealthDay)—Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act requires publication of the results of completed trials of cancer drugs conducted in the United States, results for almost half of the studies have not been made publicly available three years later, according to research published online July 22 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Thi-Anh-Hoa Nguyen, of the Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, and colleagues searched an online registry for phase II, III, and IV trials of conducted in the United States that had a primary completion date between Dec. 26, 2007, and May 31, 2010. ClinicalTrials.gov and PubMed were searched to identify published results of these .

The researchers found 646 clinical trials of cancer drugs, including 209 (RCTs). At one year following completion, the results for 9 percent of the clinical trials were posted online at ClinicalTrials.gov, 12 percent were published in journals, and 20 percent were available via both sources. For RCTs, at one year following completion, the results for 12 percent of the clinical trials were posted online at ClinicalTrials.gov, 5 percent were published in journals, and 17 percent were available via both sources. At three years, for all clinical trials and RCTs, respectively, the results for 31 and 38 percent were posted online at ClinicalTrials.gov, 35 and 32 percent were published in journals, and 55 and 56 percent were available via both sources. For phase III trials, the results were publicly available for 15 percent of the studies at 12 months, 39 percent at 24 months, and 64 percent at 36 months.

"The article describe[s] an incomplete picture of cancer drug reporting that has potentially profound effects on patient management and counseling, as timely and complete dissemination of results can refine patient treatments, outcomes, and safety," write the authors of an accompanying editorial.

Explore further: Clinical trials published almost two years after completion

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Related Stories

Clinical trials published almost two years after completion

March 6, 2013
(HealthDay)—Clinical trials are published, on average, almost two years after completion, with time to publication affected by the funding source, number of trial participants, and journal impact factor, according to a ...

Positive outcome no more likely in industry-funded trials

July 5, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Industry-sponsored clinical trials of rheumatoid arthritis drugs are no more likely to report positive outcomes than trials funded by other means, and in many cases use better methodology, according to research ...

Many NIH-funded clinical trials go unpublished over two years after completion

January 4, 2012
In a study that investigates the challenges of disseminating clinical research findings in peer-reviewed biomedical journals, Yale School of Medicine researchers have found that fewer than half of a sample of trials primarily ...

Children continue to be underrepresented in drug trials

July 23, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Even for conditions with a high pediatric disease burden, only a small proportion of clinical drug trials study pediatric patients, according to research published online July 23 in Pediatrics.

Treatments, not prevention, dominate diabetes research

April 5, 2013
Research for diabetes is far more focused on drug therapies than preventive measures, and tends to exclude children and older people who have much to gain from better disease management, according to a Duke Medicine study.

Are clinical trial data shared sufficiently today?

July 9, 2013
Ben Goldacre, research fellow at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, says we need all the evidence to make informed decisions about medicines.

Recommended for you

T-cells engineered to outsmart tumors induce clinical responses in relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma

January 16, 2018
WASHINGTON-(Jan. 16, 2018)-Tumors have come up with ingenious strategies that enable them to evade detection and destruction by the immune system. So, a research team that includes Children's National Health System clinician-researchers ...

Researchers identify new treatment target for melanoma

January 16, 2018
Researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have identified a new therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma. For decades, research has associated female sex and a history of previous ...

More evidence of link between severe gum disease and cancer risk

January 16, 2018
Data collected during a long-term health study provides additional evidence for a link between increased risk of cancer in individuals with advanced gum disease, according to a new collaborative study led by epidemiologists ...

Researchers develop a remote-controlled cancer immunotherapy system

January 15, 2018
A team of researchers has developed an ultrasound-based system that can non-invasively and remotely control genetic processes in live immune T cells so that they recognize and kill cancer cells.

Dietary fat, changes in fat metabolism may promote prostate cancer metastasis

January 15, 2018
Prostate tumors tend to be what scientists call "indolent" - so slow-growing and self-contained that many affected men die with prostate cancer, not of it. But for the percentage of men whose prostate tumors metastasize, ...

Pancreatic tumors may require a one-two-three punch

January 15, 2018
One of the many difficult things about pancreatic cancer is that tumors are resistant to most treatments because of their unique density and cell composition. However, in a new Wilmot Cancer Institute study, scientists discovered ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Sinister1811
1 / 5 (1) Jul 24, 2013
All you have to do is look on here:

http://www.clinic...h=Search

And you won't see the results published for anything. Not a damned thing.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.