Exercise could help disabled people, but too few are active, CDC reports

May 6, 2014 by Steven Reinberg, Healthday Reporter
Exercise could help disabled people, but too few are active: CDC
Lack of workouts increases the risk of chronic diseases, experts say.

(HealthDay)—Half of the 21 million Americans who have a disability don't exercise, and that lack of exercise is jeopardizing their health, federal officials reported Tuesday.

Among these 11 million inactive adults are people who have difficulty walking or climbing stairs, have problems hearing or seeing, or have trouble concentrating, remembering or making decisions, officials said.

Many of these disabled adults are able to , but don't do so regularly or at all, Ileana Arias, principal deputy director at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said during a news conference.

"We are very concerned about this, because working-age adults with disabilities who get no aerobic are 50 percent more likely to have cancer, diabetes, stroke or heart disease than those who get the recommended amount of physical activity," Arias said.

"We know that regular aerobic physical activity increases heart and lung function, improves daily living activities and independence, decreases the chance of developing chronic diseases and also improves mental health," Arias said. "If doctors and health professionals recommend aerobic physical activity to adults with disabilities, then adults with disabilities are 82 percent more likely to be physically active," she added.

Speaking at the news conference, Dianna Carroll, an epidemiologist in CDC's Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, said, "We don't know if disability leads to inactivity and chronic disease, or if inactivity and chronic disease lead to disability."

What's clear, she said, is that exercise has the potential to prevent chronic disease, improve the health of someone with a chronic disease and help reduce the risk of additional .

But, 47 percent of adults with disabilities who are able to do aerobic physical activity don't do so. An additional 22 percent aren't active enough. Yet, only 44 percent of these adults who saw a doctor in the past year left with a recommendation to exercise, Carroll said.

According to Carroll, 57 percent of adults with limited mobility, 40 percent of adults with memory and thinking problems, 36 percent of those with serious vision problems and 33 percent of those with serious hearing difficulties get no .

That's in contrast to the 26 percent of adults who don't have a disability and get no exercise, she added.

Carroll noted that government guidelines for Americans recommend that all , including those with disabilities, get at least 150 minutes—2.5 hours—of moderate aerobic physical activity each week.

If some people with disabilities can't reach this goal, they should do the best they can. The key is to avoid inactivity, Carroll said. "Some activity is better than none," she said.

People should start slowly, and exercise for at least 10 minutes each time. They should gradually increase their activity to reach the goal of at least 2.5 hours a week of , Carroll said.

Activities can include walking, swimming and biking. Even rolling yourself in a wheelchair is exercise, she said.

People with disabilities can encounter barriers that deter them from exercising. These include physical barriers such as no curb-cuts on sidewalks, no ramps into gyms, and parks and trails that aren't safe or easy to navigate, Carroll said.

She also said psychological barriers play a role. These include lack of support from family and friends or feeling self-conscious about using a gym and asking for help.

People with disabilities need to develop the confidence and the belief in their ability to do aerobic exercise as a way of improving their health, Arias said.

Samantha Heller, a senior clinical nutritionist and exercise physiologist at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City, said, "For some people with disabilities, the idea of movement and exercise is daunting and they do not know how or where to begin."

Health professionals can take a proactive approach with their patients with disabilities by referring them for physical or occupational therapy, she said.

"Physical and occupational therapy are terrific places for people with to kick-start their . Patients, too, can be proactive in their own health care and demand referrals for physical or ," Heller said.

Depending on the type and level of disability, exercise options may include aquatic exercise, chair yoga, adapted Tai Chi, wall push-ups, balance exercises and stability ball exercises, she said.

Explore further: Even routine housework may help stave off disability

More information: Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for more on physical activity.

Related Stories

Even routine housework may help stave off disability

April 30, 2014
(HealthDay)—Daily physical activity as light as pushing a shopping cart, vacuuming the house or strolling through a museum can dramatically reduce a person's risk of disability, a new study reports.

Fewer than half US adults get enough exercise

August 7, 2012
Fewer than half of US adults get enough physical activity for their health, said a US government study released Tuesday.

Only one in five Americans gets enough exercise, CDC report says

May 2, 2013
(HealthDay)—Most Americans are falling short when it comes to exercise, a new government report shows.

People with a disability more likely to be obese, have chronic illnesses

June 27, 2013
Adults with a disability are more likely to be obese or extremely obese than those without a disability according to a study led by researchers at The University of Texas School of Public Health, which is part of The University ...

Motivating healthy adults to be more physically active improves their cardiorespiratory fitness

December 11, 2013
Fewer than half of adults in the United States meet the recommended physical activity guidelines set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Often physical inactivity may be associated with overweight and obese ...

Obesity is a major obstacle for disabled americans

July 17, 2013
Obesity and its related health problems impacts far more people with a disability than previously reported, according to new research in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Recommended for you

Schoolchildren who use e-cigarettes are more likely to try tobacco

August 17, 2017
Vaping - or the use of e-cigarettes - is widely accepted as a safer option for people who are already smoking.

Study shows cigarette makers shifted stance on nicotine patches, gum

August 17, 2017
The use of nicotine patches, gum, lozenges, inhalers or nasal sprays—together called "nicotine replacement therapy," or NRT—came into play in 1984 as prescription medicine, which when combined with counseling, helped ...

Federal snack program does not yield expected impacts, researchers find

August 17, 2017
A well-intentioned government regulation designed to offer healthier options in school vending machines has failed to instill better snacking habits in a sample of schools in Appalachian Virginia, according to a study by ...

In a nutshell: Walnuts activate brain region involved in appetite control

August 17, 2017
Packed with nutrients linked to better health, walnuts are also thought to discourage overeating by promoting feelings of fullness. Now, in a new brain imaging study, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) ...

Energy dense foods may increase cancer risk regardless of obesity status

August 17, 2017
Diet is believed to play a role in cancer risk. Current research shows that an estimated 30% of cancers could be prevented through nutritional modifications. While there is a proven link between obesity and certain types ...

Technology is changing Generation smartphone, and not always for the better

August 16, 2017
It's easy to imagine some graybeard long ago weighing in on how this new generation, with all its fancy wheels, missed out on the benefits of dragging stuff from place to place.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.