New study adds weight to connection between fat taste and obesity

May 26, 2014

Deakin University health researchers have found that people who do not taste fat in food are more likely to overeat, adding weight to the growing body of research that points to a connection between fat taste and obesity.

The researchers with Deakin's Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research have found that people who can't taste the in foods eat significantly more at lunch after having a high fat breakfast than those who can taste fat.

"These results suggest that the ability to taste fat is linked with the fullness experienced from fat," explained Deakin's Professor Russell Keast.

"If you do not taste fat or experience the fullness associated with eating fatty , you are likely to be more hungry and consume more energy after an earlier fatty meal. And as we know overconsumption of foods, particularly fatty foods, is associated with people being overweight or obese."

For the study, the participants' sensitivity to fat taste was tested. Then, over four separate days, they ate a high fat, high carbohydrate, high protein breakfast and were provided with a buffet style lunch where they ate a variety of foods until comfortably full. Measurements of energy consumed at lunch were recorded as was the participants' perceived hunger and fullness.

This latest research builds on Professor Keast's previous work that found fat is part of the tongue's taste range (along with sweet, salt, sour, bitter and umami) and supports conjecture that the ability to taste fat is associated with development of obesity.

"It is becoming clear that our ability to taste fat is a factor in the development of obesity," Professor Keast said.

"We know that people have a taste threshold for fat. Some people have a high sensitivity to the taste and are likely to eat less fatty foods, while others are less sensitive and cannot taste fat and are more likely to overeat fatty foods.

"Through this latest study we now see that low sensitivity to fat taste impairs the body's ability to register the fullness signals that would normally come from eating .

"The evidence is therefore building that increasing fat taste sensitivity in those who are insensitive is required as one way to address the growing problem."

The latest study, Impaired oral fatty acid chemoreception is associated with acute excess energy consumption, is published online in the international research journal Appetite.

Explore further: Smoking may dull obese women's ability to taste fat and sugar

More information: Russell S.J. Keast, Kaylee M. Azzopardi, Lisa P. Newman, Rivkeh Y. Haryono, "Impaired oral fatty acid chemoreception is associated with acute excess energy consumption," Appetite, Volume 80, 1 September 2014, Pages 1-6, ISSN 0195-6663, dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2014.04.022.

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