Glucagon, GLP-1 co-infusion can reduce appetite

June 25, 2014
Glucagon, GLP-1 co-infusion can reduce appetite

(HealthDay)—Co-infusion of glucagon and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) correlates with a reduction in appetite, and GLP-1 protects against glucagon-induced hyperglycemia in healthy volunteers, according to a study published online June 17 in Diabetes.

Jaimini Cegla, M.B.B.S., from Imperial College London in the United Kingdom, and colleagues conducted a double-blind, cross-over study involving 13 human volunteers to examine the effect of administration of a combination of glucagon and GLP-1. Sub-anorectic doses of each peptide alone, in combination, or placebo were infused into volunteers for 120 minutes. After 90 minutes, an ad libitum meal was provided, and was determined.

The researchers found that there was no significant reduction in with either glucagon or GLP-1 given individually. Co-infusion led to a significant 13 percent reduction in food intake. The addition of GLP-1 also offered protection against glucagon-induced hyperglycemia; co-infusion correlated with a 53kcal/day increase in energy expenditure.

"These observations support the concept of GLP-1 and glucagon dual agonism as a possible treatment for obesity and diabetes," the authors write.

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