Mixed reviews for healthier school lunch fare

July 14, 2014 by Philip Marcelo

School cafeteria managers on the hunt for foods that are healthy and will also please finicky students are sampling bean burgers, peanut butter substitutes and other alternatives at a convention in Boston.

Nutritional standards that take effect this fall call for less and more whole grains and fruits and vegetables. The requirements, from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, also call for healthier snacks and drinks in school vending machines and .

Reviews were mixed Monday as school cafeteria managers sampled offerings at the School Nutrition Association's annual conference in Boston.

After initially supporting the requirements two years ago, the group is calling on Congress to delay some of them because school lunch programs are struggling to meet budgets.

Explore further: Schools seek changes to healthier lunch rules

Related Stories

Schools seek changes to healthier lunch rules

May 5, 2014
School nutrition directors across the country say government-mandated changes to cafeteria menus have been expensive and difficult to put in place.

Schools help kids choose carrots over candy bars

November 13, 2013
When schools adopt healthful nutrition policies and practices, kids' diets improve.

New rules aim to rid US schools of junk foods

June 27, 2013
(AP)—High-calorie sports drinks and candy bars will be removed from vending machines and cafeteria lines at all U.S. schools as soon as next year, replaced with diet drinks, granola bars and other healthier items.

Rules would make school snacks healthier

February 1, 2013
(AP)—The government for the first time is proposing broad new standards to make school snacks healthier, a move that would ban the sale of almost all candy, high-calorie sports drinks and greasy foods on campus.

Chips, sodas out, healthier fare in with new school snack rules

February 4, 2013
(HealthDay)—The days when U.S. children can get themselves a sugary soda or a chocolate bar from a school vending machine may be numbered, if newly proposed government rules take effect.

Offer kids whole grains; they'll eat them, study shows

June 24, 2014
(Medical Xpress)—Many parents presume their children will shun whole grains because they think they don't like them, a University of Florida researcher says, but a new UF study may start to debunk that idea.

Recommended for you

Women run faster after taking newly developed supplement, study finds

January 19, 2018
A new study found that women who took a specially prepared blend of minerals and nutrients for a month saw their 3-mile run times drop by almost a minute.

Americans are getting more sleep

January 19, 2018
Although more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye. According to data from 181,335 respondents aged 15 and older who participated ...

Wine is good for you—to a point

January 18, 2018
The Mediterranean diet has become synonymous with healthy eating, but there's one thing in it that stands out: It's cool to drink wine.

Sleep better, lose weight?

January 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Sleeplessness could cost you when it's time to stand on your bathroom scale, a new British study suggests.

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.