Oregon Medicaid targets expensive hepatitis drug

July 31, 2014 by Jonathan J. Cooper

(AP)—An Oregon Medicaid committee is expected to significantly scale back access to an effective—but expensive—new drug used to treat hepatitis C.

The decision on Thursday would allow only a narrow set of Medicaid patients to be treated with the $1,000-per-pill drug known as Sovaldi.

Medical experts on Oregon's pharmaceutical review committee question whether the drug is worth the . Oregon's guidelines would allow the drug to be used only for patients with later stages of who have been compliant with previous medical treatments and drug-free for at least six months. The drug could only be prescribed by a liver specialist.

Oregon is grappling with the issue a day after Illinois' Medicaid program put in place tight restrictions on the use of the drug.

Explore further: Medical groups question price of new hep C drug

Related Stories

Medical groups question price of new hep C drug

March 11, 2014
An innovative hepatitis C drug that was only recently hailed as a breakthrough treatment is facing skepticism from some health care experts, as they consider whether it is worth the $1,000-a-pill price set by manufacturer ...

$1,000 Sovaldi now hepatitis treatment of choice

July 29, 2014
(AP)—A new $1,000-per-pill drug has become the treatment of choice for Americans with hepatitis C, a liver-wasting disease that affects more than 3 million.

FDA advisers unanimously back J&J hepatitis C drug

October 24, 2013
An experimental hepatitis C drug from Johnson & Johnson has won unanimous support from government experts who say the medication should be approved to treat patients infected with the liver-destroying virus.

$1,000-a-pill Sovaldi jolts US health care system (Update)

June 17, 2014
The latest pill for hepatitis C sounds like a difficult choice. Sovaldi cures the liver-wasting disease in 9 of 10 patients, but treatment can cost more than $90,000.

EU nations join forces against 'exorbitant' hepatitis C drug: France

July 10, 2014
France said Thursday it has joined forces with 13 other European countries to negotiate a lower price for a promising new hepatitis C drug that has drawn controversy for its astronomical cost.

Cure rate for experimental hepatitis C drug tops 95 percent

April 10, 2014
(HealthDay)—Researchers report that an experimental drug has cured more than 95 percent of patients infected with hepatitis C, including some who failed other treatments.

Recommended for you

Sensor-equipped pill raises technological, ethical questions

November 17, 2017
The first drug with a sensor embedded in a pill that alerts doctors when patients have taken their medications was approved by the Food and Drug Administration, raiding issues involving privacy, cost, and whether patients ...

New painkillers reduce overdose risk

November 16, 2017
Scientists on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed new opioid pain relievers that reduce pain on par with morphine but do not slow or stop breathing—the cause of opiate overdose.

Separating side effects could hold key for safer opioids

November 16, 2017
Opioid pain relievers can be extremely effective in relieving pain, but can carry a high risk of addiction and ultimately overdose when breathing is suppressed and stops. Scientists have discovered a way to separate these ...

US regulators approve first digital pill to track patients

November 14, 2017
U.S. regulators have approved the first drug with a sensor that alerts doctors when the medication has been taken, offering a new way of monitoring patients but also raising privacy concerns.

Introduction is different, but top medications for opioid addiction equally effective

November 14, 2017
With opioid addiction officially declared a public health emergency in the U.S., medical intervention to treat the illness is increasingly important in responding to the epidemic. Now, a new study concludes that two of the ...

Drugstore pain pills as effective as opioids in ER patients

November 7, 2017
Emergency rooms are where many patients are first introduced to powerful opioid painkillers, but what if doctors offered over-the-counter pills instead? A new study tested that approach on patients with broken bones and sprains ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.