Controlling inflammation to reduce chronic disease risk

August 7, 2015, ILSI Europe

An unresolved inflammatory response is likely to be involved from the early stages of disease development. Controlling inflammation is crucial to human health and a key future preventative and therapeutic target. In a recent ILSI Europe's article published in the British Journal of Nutrition, a coalition of experts explain how nutrition influences inflammatory processes and help reduce chronic diseases risk.

Inflammation is a normal component of host defence, but elevated unresolved chronic inflammation is a core perturbation in a range of . Prevention or control of low-grade inflammation therefore seems to be an attractive target effect for healthy food or food ingredients. In a recent article commissioned by the ILSI Europe Obesity and Diabetes Task Force, experts present new approaches to capture inflammatory status in humans and to help quantify how much diet can positively modulate inflammation.

"Inflammation acts as both a friend and foe, being essential in metabolic regulation, with unresolved low-grade being a pathological feature of a wide range of chronic conditions including the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases", commented Prof. Anne Marie Minihane, University of East Anglia (UK).

The nutrition status of the individual with for example a deficiency or excess of certain micronutrients (e.g. folate, vitamin B12, vitamin B6, vitamin 1, vitamin E, zinc) may lead to an ineffective or excessive . Studies have showed that high consumption of fat and glucose may induce post-prandial (manifesting itself after the consumption of a meal), which may have consequences for the development of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The Western-style diet, rich in fat and simple sugars but often poor in specific micronutrients, is linked to the increased prevalence of diseases with strong immunogical and autoimmune components, including allergies, food allergies, atopic dermatitis and obesity.

Explore further: Newly identified molecular mechanism plays role in type 2 diabetes development

More information: "Low-grade inflammation, diet composition and health: current research evidence and its translation." British Journal of Nutrition 2015; journals.cambridge.org/action/ … Id=S0007114515002093

Related Stories

Newly identified molecular mechanism plays role in type 2 diabetes development

July 30, 2015
New research from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health describes a molecular mechanism that helps explain how obesity-related inflammation can lead to type 2 diabetes. The findings describe a surprising connection between ...

Weight loss plus vitamin D reduces inflammation linked to cancer, chronic disease

June 25, 2015
For the first time, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have found that weight loss, in combination with vitamin D supplementation, has a greater effect on reducing chronic inflammation than weight loss ...

Chronic inflammation linked to less likelihood of healthy aging

September 16, 2013
Chronic exposure to high levels of interleukin-6 was associated with a significantly lower likelihood of healthy aging, according to a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Obese male mice produce more disease-promoting immune cells than females

May 26, 2015
Obesity may be tougher on male immune systems than females, a new study in mice at the University of Michigan Medical School suggests.

Wild blueberries (bilberries) can help tackle the adverse effects of a high-fat diet

December 18, 2014
Eating bilberries diminishes the adverse effects of a high-fat diet, according to a recent study at the University of Eastern Finland. For the first time, bilberries were shown to have beneficial effects on both blood pressure ...

Vitamin D helps immune cells prevent atherosclerosis and diabetes

March 19, 2015
In recent years, a deficiency of vitamin D has been linked to type 2 diabetes and heart disease, two illnesses that commonly occur together and are the most common cause of illness and death in Western countries. Both disorders ...

Recommended for you

Research team diagnoses asthma with nasal brush test

June 11, 2018
Mount Sinai researchers have identified a genetic biomarker of asthma that can be tested for using a simple nasal brush and basic follow-up data analysis. This inexpensive diagnostic test can accurately identify mild to moderate ...

Eosinophilic esophagitis may be due to missing protein

June 7, 2018
Scientists have discovered that the absence of a specific protein in cells lining the esophagus may cause inflammation and tissue damage in people with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). EoE affects as many as 150,000 people ...

Mouse study links triclosan, a common antimicrobial, to colonic inflammation

May 30, 2018
A large research team led by senior author Guodong Zhang at the University of Massachusetts Amherst reports that the antimicrobial ingredient triclosan, found in hand soaps and toothpastes among other products, could have ...

Body knows best: A natural healing mechanism for inflammatory bowel disease

May 30, 2018
Treating inflammatory diseases of the bowel is extremely challenging: Genes, gut microbes and disrupted immune function all contribute. Weizmann Institute of Science researchers are proposing a way around this complexity. ...

Chance discovery links inflammatory bowel disease with common bacterial gut toxin

May 17, 2018
New research has uncovered a surprise link between a common bacterial toxin found in the gut and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

New cytokine network can repair tissue damage in the intestine, study finds

May 16, 2018
A new group of proteins called cytokines, critical for antimicrobial activity and repairing the damaged intestinal tissue found in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), has been discovered by researchers in a study led by Georgia ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

SusejDog
not rated yet Aug 08, 2015
vitamin 1

Pretty sure they meant vitamin B1. Supplemental forms include thiamine (water soluble), benfotiamine (fat soluble), and thiamine diphosphate (downstream derivative of thiamine).

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.