High fat/low carb diet could combat schizophrenia

High fat/low carb diet could combat schizophrenia
Chart of some effects of the ketogenic diet on mice

Research by James Cook University scientists has found a diet favoured by body-builders may be effective in treating schizophrenia.

Associate Professor Zoltan Sarnyai and his research group from JCU's Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine (AITHM) have discovered that feeding mice a , which is high on fat but very low on carbohydrates (sugars), leads to fewer animal behaviours that resemble schizophrenia.

The ketogenic has been used since the 1920s to manage epilepsy in children and more recently as a weight loss diet preferred by some body builders.

Dr Sarnyai believes the diet may work by providing in the form of so-called ketone bodies (products of fat breakdown) and by helping to circumvent abnormally functioning cellular energy pathways in the brains of schizophrenics.

"Most of a person's energy would come from fat. So the diet would consist of butter, cheese, salmon, etc. Initially it would be used in addition to medication in an in-patient setting where the patient's diet could be controlled," he said.

Schizophrenia is a devastating, that affects nearly one per cent of people worldwide. There is no cure and medications used to alleviate it can produce side effects such as movement disorder, and cardiovascular disease.

But if the research findings can be translated into the effective management of schizophrenia they may offer a secondary benefit too.

The group's paper, published online in the leading journal Schizophrenia Research, also shows mice on a ketogenic diet weigh less and have lower than mice fed a normal diet.

"It's another advantage that it works against the weight gain, cardiovascular issues and type-two diabetes we see as common side-effects of drugs given to control schizophrenia," said Dr Sarnyai.

The JCU researchers will now test their findings in other animal schizophrenia models as they explore a possible clinical trial.


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Low-carb, high-fat diets may reduce seizures in tough-to-treat epilepsy

More information: Ann Katrin Kraeuter et al. Ketogenic diet reverses behavioral abnormalities in an acute NMDA receptor hypofunction model of schizophrenia, Schizophrenia Research (2015). DOI: 10.1016/j.schres.2015.10.041
Citation: High fat/low carb diet could combat schizophrenia (2015, December 17) retrieved 18 June 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-12-high-fatlow-carb-diet-combat.html
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