Study links late sleep timing to poorer diet quality and lower physical activity

June 8, 2016, American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Credit: xiaphias/Wikipedia

A new study suggests that among healthy adults with a habitual sleep duration of at least 6.5 hours, late sleep timing was associated with higher fast food consumption and lower vegetable intake, particularly among men, as well as lower physical activity.

Results show that late sleep timing is associated with lower body mass index and is not associated with total caloric intake; however, it remains associated with poorer diet quality, particularly fast food, vegetable and dairy intake.

"Our results help us further understand how sleep timing in addition to duration may affect obesity risk," said principal investigator Kelly Glazer Baron, PhD, associate professor of neurology at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago, Illinois. "It is possible that poor dietary behaviors may predispose individuals with late sleep to increased risk of weight gain."

The research abstract was published recently in an online supplement of the journal Sleep and will be presented Sunday, June 12, in Denver at SLEEP 2016, the 30th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC (APSS).

The study group consisted of 96 healthy adults between the ages of 18 and 50 years with sleep duration of 6.5 hours or more. The study involved 7 days of wrist actigraphy to measure sleep, food diaries to measure caloric intake and dietary patterns, and SenseWear arm band monitoring to measure physical activity. Dim light melatonin onset was evaluated in the clinical research unit. Body fat was evaluated using dual axis absorptiometry (DXA). Data were analyzed using correlation and regression analyses controlling for age, sex, and efficiency.

Explore further: Night owls may be more sedentary, less motivated to exercise

Related Stories

Night owls may be more sedentary, less motivated to exercise

June 3, 2014
A new study suggests that night owls are more sedentary and feel that they have a harder time maintaining an exercise schedule.

Children with TBI have poorer sleep quality and more daytime sleepiness

June 8, 2015
A new study suggests that children with traumatic brain injuries (TBI) have poorer sleep and more daytime sleepiness in comparison to healthy children.

Study shows impact of sleep on gestational weight gain during pregnancy

February 1, 2016
In a study to be presented on Feb. 4 at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in Atlanta, researchers will present findings from a study titled, Short and long sleep durations in ...

Fatty diets lead to daytime sleepiness, poor sleep

April 20, 2016
University of Adelaide researchers have found that men who consume diets high in fat are more likely to feel sleepy during the day, to report sleep problems at night, and are also more likely to suffer from sleep apnoea.

Study suggests that what you eat can influence how you sleep

January 14, 2016
A new study found that eating less fiber, more saturated fat and more sugar is associated with lighter, less restorative, and more disrupted sleep.

Study links sleep duration and frequent snoring to poorer breast cancer survival

May 5, 2016
A new study reports that short sleep duration combined with frequent snoring reported prior to cancer diagnosis may influence subsequent breast cancer survival.

Recommended for you

Eating iron-fortified grain improves students' attention, memory

July 18, 2018
Adolescent students in a rural school in India who consumed an iron-biofortified version of the grain pearl millet exhibited improved attention and memory compared to those who consumed conventional pearl millet, according ...

Lowering hospitals' Medicare costs proves difficult

July 18, 2018
A payment system that provides financial incentives for hospitals that reduce health-care costs for Medicare patients did not lower costs as intended, according to a new study led by Washington University School of Medicine ...

Vaping tied to blood clots—in mice

July 18, 2018
A new study involving mice raises another concern about the danger of e-cigarettes in humans after experiments showed that short-term exposure to the device's vapors appeared to increase the risk of clot formation.

People who tan in gyms tan more often, and more addictively, than others, new research shows

July 18, 2018
Gyms are places people go to get healthier. But nearly half the gyms in the U.S. contain a potentially addictive carcinogen—tanning beds, report UConn researchers in the July 18 issue of JAMA Dermatology.

Omega 3 supplements have little or no heart or vascular health benefit: review

July 17, 2018
New evidence published today shows there is little or no effect of omega 3 supplements on our risk of experiencing heart disease, stroke or death.

Study shows that people most affected by alcohol also most impacted by sleep deprivation

July 17, 2018
A team of researchers from the German Aerospace Center and Forschungszentrum Jülich has found that people who are most susceptible to alcohol intoxication are also most susceptible to cognitive problems due to sleep deprivation. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.