Researchers find immunotherapy treatments better for advanced skin cancer

November 4, 2016, McMaster University

McMaster University researchers have found that for patients diagnosed in the late stages of one of the most common and deadly forms of skin cancer, treatment with a combination of immunotherapy options improves survival and lowers the risk of life-threatening events.

"This is the first analysis to draw comparison between targeted and immune therapies for BRAF-mutated melanomas," said Feng Xie, an associate professor in the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at McMaster's Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine. "Our results will help patients and clinicians choose treatments."

Feng Xie is a principal investigator of the study, recently published in JAMA Oncology.

Cutaneous melanoma is an aggressive and deadly form of . According to the Canadian Cancer Society, the disease accounts for 3.3 per cent of new cancer cases each year in Canada, and it has a 15 per cent death rate.

In its early stages, melanoma is often cured with surgery alone, however most patients who are diagnosed in the late stages of disease are not candidates for surgery and drug therapy is the main course of treatment.

Tahira Devji, the first author of the paper and a PhD student of McMaster's Health Research Methodology Program, said that around 40 to 60 per cent of melanomas have a mutation in the BRAF protein.

A number of effective treatment options are available for patients with advanced BRAF-mutated melanoma, which fall under two classes of drug therapies: targeted therapy, like chemotherapy, which stops cancer from growing and spreading; and immunotherapy, which works by stimulating the immune system to attack tumour cells. It has been unclear which is the optimal initial treatment.

The goal of the study was to estimate the relative efficacy and safety of systemic therapies for those who have been diagnosed with advanced BRAF-mutated melanoma but not yet received any treatment.

The team evaluated 15 randomized controlled trials published between 2011 and 2015, assessing the benefits and harms of targeted or immune checkpoint inhibitors in 6,662 patients with cancer that had spread to the lymph nodes and surgery was not an option, or distant metastatic melanoma.

They found that combined BRAF and MEK targeted therapy and PD-1 immunotherapy were both equally effective in improving overall survival. Combined BRAF and MEK inhibition was most effective in improving progression-free survival. PD-1 inhibition was associated with the lowest risk of life-threatening events.

They concluded that the safety of PD-1 inhibitors supports using this treatment option as first-line therapy in circumstances where quick action is not a priority.

"While the data in our study represents best available evidence, using more than one kind of immunotherapy shows promise in early outcomes in clinical trials and could change the treatment landscape once longer-term results are published," said Feng Xie.

Explore further: Immune and targeted therapies with radiation therapy improves outcomes for melanoma brain metastases patients

Related Stories

Immune and targeted therapies with radiation therapy improves outcomes for melanoma brain metastases patients

September 21, 2016
Brain metastases are one of the most common complications of advanced melanoma, requiring multidisciplinary management. Patients who are diagnosed with these metastases have an expected median survival of only 4 to 5 months. ...

New insight into drug resistance in metastatic melanoma

June 3, 2014
(Medical Xpress)—A study by scientists in Manchester has shown how melanoma drugs can cause the cancer to progress once a patient has stopped responding to treatment.

New drug, Vemurafenib, doubles survival of metastatic melanoma patients

March 1, 2012
A report published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that the 50 percent of metastatic melanoma patients with a specific genetic mutation benefit from the drug Vemurafenib – increasing median survival ...

Researchers discover mechanism leading to BRAF inhibitor resistance in melanoma

June 19, 2015
The development of targeted therapies has significantly improved the survival of melanoma patients over the last decade; however, patients often relapse because many therapies do not kill all of the tumor cells, and the remaining ...

Combining radiation with immunotherapy showing promise against melanoma

May 19, 2016
Combining radiation treatments with a new generation of immunotherapies is showing promise as a one-two-punch against melanoma, Loyola Medicine researchers report in the Journal of Radiation Oncology.

Yale launches national study of personalized medicine for metastatic melanoma

April 15, 2015
Yale University has launched a multicenter clinical trial, sponsored by Stand Up to Cancer and Melanoma Research Alliance, that will apply the latest in personalized medicine technology to treat metastatic melanoma. The trial, ...

Recommended for you

A new tactic for starving tumors

June 25, 2018
A tumor's goal is simple: to grow, grow, grow, by making more cancer cells. But that often means growing so fast that the oxygen supply gets scarce, at which point cells within the tumor start to suffocate. Without oxygen, ...

Immune profile for successful cancer immunotherapy discovered

June 25, 2018
In a new study published online June 25, 2018 in Nature Medicine, UC San Francisco researchers have identified a key biological pathway in human cancer patients that appears to prime the immune system for a successful response ...

'Embattled' breast cancer drugs could be revived by new discovery

June 25, 2018
More than 60 percent of breast cancer cases involve defects in the same biochemical chain of events within cancer cells—known as the PI3 kinase (PI3K) pathway—but efforts to develop therapies targeting this pathway have ...

Lethal prostate cancer treatment may benefit from combination immunotherapy

June 25, 2018
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy (BKI) released a study investigating the use of combination checkpoint immunotherapy in the treatment of a ...

New drugs are improving survival times for patients with aggressive type of blood cancer, study finds

June 25, 2018
Survival times for a highly aggressive type of blood cancer have nearly doubled over the last decade due to the introduction of new targeted drugs, a Yorkshire study has shown.

Dying cancer cells make remaining glioblastoma cells more aggressive and therapy-resistant

June 21, 2018
A surprising form of cell-to-cell communication in glioblastoma promotes global changes in recipient cells, including aggressiveness, motility, and resistance to radiation or chemotherapy.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.