FDA-approved all oral DAA regimens show high cure rate for hepatitis C

March 20, 2017, American College of Physicians
Electron micrographs of hepatitis C virus purified from cell culture. Scale bar is 50 nanometers. Credit: Center for the Study of Hepatitis C, The Rockefeller University.

FDA-approved oral direct-acting antiviral (DAA) regimens produce high sustained virologic response (SVR) rates for all six hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes and for patient populations historically considered difficult to cure. The ease of dosing, safety profile, and effectiveness of DAAs provide an opportunity to reduce the burden of hepatitis C in the United States, provided barriers to care are addressed.

The results of a systematic evidence review are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, MD, reviewed data from 42 published clinical trials of adults with chronic HCV infection that evaluated at least 8 weeks of an interferon-free HCV regimen that included at least 2 FDA-approved DAAs. These included inhibitors of HCV NS3 protease (grazoprevir, paritaprevir, and simeprevir); NS5A (daclatasvir, elbasvir, ledipasvir, ombitasvir, and velpatasvir); and NS5B polymerase (sofosbuvir and dasabuvir), as well as the oral antiviral ribavirin. Six DAA regimens showed SVR rates of greater than 95 percent in patients with HCV genotype 1 without cirrhosis, including those with HIV co-infection. Cure rates were similar for the remaining genotypes of HCV, although fewer regimens were effective for 2.

The authors of an accompanying editorial suggest that these findings provide hope that HCV is now fully treatable and can potentially be eliminated as an important medical problem in the United States. While HCV is now easy to treat, there are still some issues, such as cost and access to care, which need to be addressed.

Explore further: New study challenges the concept of treatment failure in hepatitis C

More information: Annals of Internal Medicine, http://annals.org/aim/article/doi/10.7326/M16-2575

Related Stories

New study challenges the concept of treatment failure in hepatitis C

April 16, 2016
Data presented today demonstrate that choosing a different combination of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) treatment for Hepatitis C can eradicate the virus at four weeks in patients who had already failed on previous medication ...

Newly approved all-oral hep C combination drug found more effective in head-to-head comparison

April 14, 2016
Findings presented today from a Phase 3 head-to-head study that compared two direct-acting antiviral treatment regimens, demonstrated that the all-oral, once daily combination of elbasvir and grazoprevir was more effective ...

Studies show effectiveness of combo treatment for HCV patients with, without cirrhosis

May 5, 2015
In two studies appearing in the May 5 issue of JAMA, patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection and with or without cirrhosis achieved high rates of sustained virologic response after 12 weeks of treatment ...

Shorter treatment course potentially on the horizon for hep C patients

April 15, 2016
Data from a Phase 2 clinical trial show that an investigational injectable treatment known as RG-101 in combination with a four week course of oral direct-acting antiviral (DAA) treatment was well tolerated and resulted in ...

Sofosbuvir-velpatasvir successful in hep C regardless of genotype

November 18, 2015
(HealthDay)—Sofosbuvir-velpatasvir is effective for hepatitis C virus (HCV), regardless of genotype, according to three studies published online Nov. 17 in the New England Journal of Medicine. The research was published ...

New pill-only regimens cure patients with hardest-to-treat hepatitis C infection

October 17, 2014
Two new pill-only regimens that rapidly cure most patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C (HCV) infection could soon be widely prescribed across Europe. Two recently-published studies1,2 confirmed the efficacy and safety of ...

Recommended for you

Kidney docs worry over no dialysis for undocumented immigrants

May 21, 2018
(HealthDay)—Undocumented immigrants in the United States are often denied treatment for kidney failure until they have a life-threatening emergency. Now a new study finds that the doctors and nurses who treat them are frustrated ...

Helping preterm infants grow bigger kidneys would prevent kidney disease later in life

May 21, 2018
Nephrons are the microscopic blood-filtering units inside our kidneys that convert waste products into urine, regulate our electrolyte levels and our blood pressure.

Clues found to early lung transplant failure

May 21, 2018
Among organ transplant patients, those receiving new lungs face a higher rate of organ failure and death compared with people undergoing heart, kidney and liver transplants. One of the culprits is inflammation that damages ...

How to ethically conduct clinical research during public health emergencies

May 21, 2018
Following the 2014-2015 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine established a committee to assess the clinical trials conducted in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. In ...

Anxious women may want to keep an eye on their bone health

May 18, 2018
(HealthDay)—As if older women didn't already worry enough about their bone health, new research suggests that anxiety may up their risk for fractures.

New strategy to cure chronic hepatitis B infection

May 18, 2018
Scientists from Karolinska Institutet and Hannover Medical School have published two studies that provide insights into how the immune system responds and helps to clear a hepatitis B infection after treatment interruption. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.