FDA-approved all oral DAA regimens show high cure rate for hepatitis C

March 20, 2017
Electron micrographs of hepatitis C virus purified from cell culture. Scale bar is 50 nanometers. Credit: Center for the Study of Hepatitis C, The Rockefeller University.

FDA-approved oral direct-acting antiviral (DAA) regimens produce high sustained virologic response (SVR) rates for all six hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes and for patient populations historically considered difficult to cure. The ease of dosing, safety profile, and effectiveness of DAAs provide an opportunity to reduce the burden of hepatitis C in the United States, provided barriers to care are addressed.

The results of a systematic evidence review are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, MD, reviewed data from 42 published clinical trials of adults with chronic HCV infection that evaluated at least 8 weeks of an interferon-free HCV regimen that included at least 2 FDA-approved DAAs. These included inhibitors of HCV NS3 protease (grazoprevir, paritaprevir, and simeprevir); NS5A (daclatasvir, elbasvir, ledipasvir, ombitasvir, and velpatasvir); and NS5B polymerase (sofosbuvir and dasabuvir), as well as the oral antiviral ribavirin. Six DAA regimens showed SVR rates of greater than 95 percent in patients with HCV genotype 1 without cirrhosis, including those with HIV co-infection. Cure rates were similar for the remaining genotypes of HCV, although fewer regimens were effective for 2.

The authors of an accompanying editorial suggest that these findings provide hope that HCV is now fully treatable and can potentially be eliminated as an important medical problem in the United States. While HCV is now easy to treat, there are still some issues, such as cost and access to care, which need to be addressed.

Explore further: New study challenges the concept of treatment failure in hepatitis C

More information: Annals of Internal Medicine, http://annals.org/aim/article/doi/10.7326/M16-2575

Related Stories

New study challenges the concept of treatment failure in hepatitis C

April 16, 2016
Data presented today demonstrate that choosing a different combination of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) treatment for Hepatitis C can eradicate the virus at four weeks in patients who had already failed on previous medication ...

Newly approved all-oral hep C combination drug found more effective in head-to-head comparison

April 14, 2016
Findings presented today from a Phase 3 head-to-head study that compared two direct-acting antiviral treatment regimens, demonstrated that the all-oral, once daily combination of elbasvir and grazoprevir was more effective ...

Studies show effectiveness of combo treatment for HCV patients with, without cirrhosis

May 5, 2015
In two studies appearing in the May 5 issue of JAMA, patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection and with or without cirrhosis achieved high rates of sustained virologic response after 12 weeks of treatment ...

Shorter treatment course potentially on the horizon for hep C patients

April 15, 2016
Data from a Phase 2 clinical trial show that an investigational injectable treatment known as RG-101 in combination with a four week course of oral direct-acting antiviral (DAA) treatment was well tolerated and resulted in ...

Sofosbuvir-velpatasvir successful in hep C regardless of genotype

November 18, 2015
(HealthDay)—Sofosbuvir-velpatasvir is effective for hepatitis C virus (HCV), regardless of genotype, according to three studies published online Nov. 17 in the New England Journal of Medicine. The research was published ...

New pill-only regimens cure patients with hardest-to-treat hepatitis C infection

October 17, 2014
Two new pill-only regimens that rapidly cure most patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C (HCV) infection could soon be widely prescribed across Europe. Two recently-published studies1,2 confirmed the efficacy and safety of ...

Recommended for you

Two Group A Streptococcus genes linked to 'flesh-eating' bacterial infections

September 22, 2017
Group A Streptococcus bacteria cause a variety of illnesses that range from mild nuisances like strep throat to life-threatening conditions including pneumonia, toxic shock syndrome and the flesh-eating disease formally known ...

Ecosystem approach makes urinary tract infection more treatable

September 22, 2017
The biological term 'ecosystem' is not usually associated with urinary tract infections, but this should change according to Wageningen scientists.

Residents: Frontline defenders against antibiotic resistance?

September 22, 2017
Antibiotic resistance continues to grow around the world, with sometimes disastrous results. Some strains of bacteria no longer respond to any currently available antibiotic, making death by infections that were once easily ...

Individualized diets for irritable bowel syndrome better than placebo

September 21, 2017
Patients with irritable bowel syndrome who follow individualized diets based on food sensitivity testing experience fewer symptoms, say Yale researchers. Their study is among the first to provide scientific evidence for this ...

Superbug's spread to Vietnam threatens malaria control

September 21, 2017
A highly drug resistant malaria 'superbug' from western Cambodia is now present in southern Vietnam, leading to alarming failure rates for dihydroartemisinin (DHA)-piperaquine—Vietnam's national first-line malaria treatment, ...

A dose of 'wait-and-see' reduces unnecessary antibiotic use

September 21, 2017
Asking patients to take a 'wait-and-see' approach before having their antibiotic prescriptions filled significantly reduces unnecessary use, a University of Queensland study has shown.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.