Specific phenotype relevant in subclinical primary aldosteronism

October 10, 2017

(HealthDay)—A suppressed renin phenotype is associated with higher incidence of incident hypertension than other plasma renin activity (PRA) phenotypes, according to a study published online Oct. 9 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Jennifer M. Brown, M.D., from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, and colleagues conducted a cohort study involving 850 untreated normotensive participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis to examine whether a spectrum of subclinical -independent aldosteronism that increases the risk of hypertension exists.

The researchers found that compared with other PRA , a suppressed renin phenotype correlated with a higher rate of incident hypertension (suppressed renin phenotype, 85.4 events; indeterminate renin phenotype, 53.3 events; unsuppressed renin phenotype, 54.5 events per 1,000 person-years of follow-up). There was an independent between higher aldosterone concentrations and increased risk for incident hypertension with renin suppression; when renin was not suppressed there was no correlation between aldosterone and . When renin was suppressed there was a correlation for higher aldosterone concentrations with lower serum potassium and higher urinary excretion of potassium.

"These findings suggest a clinically relevant spectrum of subclinical primary aldosteronism (renin-independent aldosteronism) in normotension," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.

Explore further: Simple blood tests lead to improved hypertension treatment in African countries

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