Skipping breakfast disrupts 'clock genes' that regulate body weight

November 30, 2017
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Irregular eating habits such as skipping breakfast are often associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease, but the precise impact of meal times on the body's internal clock has been less clear.

A new Tel Aviv University study now pinpoints the effect of on the expression of "clock " that regulate the post-meal glucose and insulin responses of both healthy individuals and diabetics.

The importance of the body's and the impact of meal times on the body were the subject of this year's Nobel Prize for Medicine, awarded for the discovery of molecular mechanisms controlling our circadian rhythm.

This TAU study was led by Prof. Daniela Jakubowicz of TAU's Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Wolfson Medical Center's Diabetes Unit. It was conducted in collaboration with Prof. Julio Wainstein and Dr. Zohar Landau of TAU's Sackler Faculty of Medicine and the Wolfson Medical Center's Diabetes Unit; Prof. Itamar Raz and Prof. Oren Froy of The Hebrew University of Jerusalem; and Prof. Bo Ahrén of Lund University in Sweden. It was recently published in Diabetes Care.

"Our study shows that breakfast consumption triggers the proper cyclic clock gene expression leading to improved glycaemic control," Prof. Jakubowicz says. "The circadian clock gene not only regulates the circadian changes of glucose metabolism, but also regulates our body weight, blood pressure, endothelial function and atherosclerosis.

"Proper meal timing—such as consuming breakfast before 9:30 AM—could lead to an improvement of the entire metabolism of the body, facilitate weight loss, and delay complications associated with type 2 diabetes and other age-related disorders."

For the study, 18 healthy volunteers and 18 obese volunteers with diabetes took part in a test day featuring breakfast and lunch, and in a test day featuring only lunch. On both days, the researchers conducted blood tests on the participants to measure their postprandial clock gene expression, plasma glucose, insulin and intact glucagon-like peptide-1 (iGLP-1) and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) plasma activity.

"Our study showed that breakfast consumption triggers the proper cyclic clock gene expression leading to improved glycaemic control," says Prof. Jakubowicz. "In both healthy individuals and in diabetics, breakfast consumption acutely improved the expression of specific clock genes linked to more efficient weight loss, and was associated with improved glucose and insulin levels after lunch."

In contrast, in test days featuring only lunch (when participants skipped breakfast), the related to weight loss were downregulated, leading to blood sugar spikes and poor insulin responses for the rest of the day, suggesting also that skipping breakfast leads to weight gain even without the incidence of overeating the rest of the day.

"The fact that we can change the gene's expression in just four hours is very impressive," says Prof. Jakubowicz. The researchers are currently conducting a long-term study comparing the effect of different meal timing schedules on the body's gene expression, glucose balance and over time.

Explore further: Diabetics who skip breakfast provoke hazardous blood sugar spikes

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4 comments

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TrustTheONE
not rated yet Nov 30, 2017
18 healthy volunteers??? Only 18??? Is that proof of anything?
Plutonic
5 / 5 (1) Nov 30, 2017
What about people who have habitually skipped breakfast for years because they aren't hungry in the morning? Does their body not adjust eventually? Would they really be better off force-feeding themselves at that time of day? I would love to see a study on habitual breakfast-skippers, including those who eat healthily for the remainder of the day. There seems to be some conflict in results of studies showing breakfast-skipping is harmful vs those showing that 16-hour fasting is beneficial. This needs to be resolved.
madness6977
5 / 5 (1) Dec 01, 2017
"Proper meal timing—such as consuming breakfast before 9:30 AM" I'm interested in knowing what assumed time of "Waking up" they're using. 6? 7? How long after waking should a diabetic (such as myself) have breakfast?
kass
5 / 5 (1) Dec 03, 2017
There seems to be some conflict in results of studies showing breakfast-skipping is harmful vs those showing that 16-hour fasting is beneficial. This needs to be resolved.


Those aren't conflicting results if the fast begins early evening. Indeed this is the recommended schedule for fasts, although it's not what I do. Most breakfast skippers are doing so because they overeat late in the day, which is likely harmful.

"Proper meal timing—such as consuming breakfast before 9:30 AM" I'm interested in knowing what assumed time of "Waking up" they're using. 6? 7? How long after waking should a diabetic (such as myself) have breakfast?

Just wake up and eat breakfast like a normal person would, and you'll be fine

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