Global health committee issues report on heart disease burden

November 30, 2017
The Committee identified 4 priority areas for actions: achieving global security, maintaining a sustained response to the continuous threats of communicable diseases, saving and improving the lives of women and children, promoting cardiovascular health and preventing cancer. Credit: Journal of the American College of Cardiology

The United States must prioritize its health resources toward detecting and treating noncommunicable diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, while maintaining and expanding prevention and eradication of infectious diseases on a global scale, according to a report modified from U.S. global health recommendations from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine (previously the Institute of Medicine) published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Appropriate strategies have the potential to not only saves lives, but also contribute to worldwide economic prosperity and growth. The United States has been a leader in promoting global through focused programs on AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis and other , and as a result of these programs and sanitation and prevention improvements, the disease burden globally has shifted from infectious diseases to .

In this report, the Committee on Global Health and the Future of the United States, was tasked with identifying current global health priorities and making recommendations to the U.S. government and other stakeholders to increase responsiveness, coordination and efficiency in addressing global health needs. They developed recommendations that, according to the paper, "would deliver a strong global health strategy and maintain the role of the United States as a leader in global health."

The committee first outlined four priority areas for action: 1) achieving global security, 2) maintaining a sustained response to the continuous threats of communicable diseases, 3) saving and improving the lives of women and children, and 4) promoting cardiovascular health and preventing cancer.

"These NASEM recommendations and this manuscript are among the most important efforts of my career, because if they are adopted by the U.S. government, they have the potential to enact true change for global health," said corresponding author Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, from Mt. Sinai Medical Center in New York. "The next step for the committee is to present these recommendations to the U.S. Senate and to President Donald J. Trump."

Three cross-cutting areas were further developed to maximize the returns on investment, achieve better health outcomes and use funding more effectively: 1) catalyze innovation through accelerated development of medical products and integrated digital health infrastructure, 2) employ more nimble and flexible financing mechanisms to leverage new partners and funders in global health, and 3) maintain U.S. status and influence as a world leader in global health while adhering to evidence-based science and economics, measurement and accountability.

Specifically, in this report, the committee focuses on the detection and management of and offers a roadmap for achieving better outcomes in preventing and treating heart , including through screening, accelerated drug development, digital health and smart financing strategies.

Explore further: UN summit on non-communicable diseases should learn from global AIDS response

Related Stories

UN summit on non-communicable diseases should learn from global AIDS response

September 6, 2011
As the world prepares to develop a global strategy to tackle some of the biggest current threats to human health, there is a lot to be learned from past successes and mistakes of the global response to HIV/AIDS.

Tackling the global post-code lottery: new research explores how law can help tackle health epidemics

November 23, 2017
Research from the University of Warwick is set to improve global health by helping lawyers to think more strategically about the ways in which the law can be used to improve access to life-saving medicines.

Cardiology leaders call for global prevention of heart disease, stroke

September 26, 2014
Heart disease and stroke contribute to 30 percent of global deaths, more than all infectious and parasitic diseases combined, and 11 cardiovascular organizations are calling for the United Nations to address prevention of ...

Integrated neglected tropical disease control and elimination programs: A global health 'best buy'

January 17, 2013
A recently released report, entitled "Social and Economic Impact Review on Neglected Tropical Diseases," highlights links between neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) and socio-economic prosperity. Published by Hudson Institute's ...

Commissions that reflected on Ebola outbreak highlight overlapping conclusions in new PLOS piece

May 19, 2016
To make the world safer against future infectious disease threats, national health systems should be strengthened, the World Health Organization's emergency and outbreak response activities should be consolidated and bolstered, ...

Global burden of cardiovascular disease assessed

May 18, 2017
(HealthDay)—Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major global burden, despite declines in the mortality rate due to CVD in high-income and some middle-income countries, according to a study published online May 17 in the Journal ...

Recommended for you

Scientists rewrite our understanding of how arteries mend

December 13, 2017
Scientists from The University of Manchester have discovered how the severity of trauma to arterial blood vessels governs how the body repairs itself.

Deadly heart rhythm halted by noninvasive radiation therapy

December 13, 2017
Radiation therapy often is used to treat cancer patients. Now, doctors at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that radiation therapy—aimed directly at the heart—can be used to treat patients ...

Ultra-thin tissue samples could help to understand and treat heart disease

December 12, 2017
A new method for preparing ultra-thin slices of heart tissue in the lab could help scientists to study how cells behave inside a beating heart.

Research reveals how diabetes in pregnancy affects baby's heart

December 12, 2017
Researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered how high glucose levels—whether caused by diabetes or other factors—keep heart cells from maturing ...

Young diabetics could have seven times higher risk for sudden cardiac death

December 12, 2017
Young diabetics could have seven times more risk of dying from sudden cardiac arrest than their peers who don't have diabetes, according to new research.

Blood flow–sensing protein protects against atherosclerosis in mice

December 12, 2017
UCLA scientists have found that a protein known as NOTCH1 helps ward off inflammation in the walls of blood vessels, preventing atherosclerosis—the narrowing and hardening of arteries that can cause heart attacks and strokes. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.