Three-pronged approach can improve physician engagement

March 13, 2018

(HealthDay)—The three-pronged approach implemented by one practice successfully improved physician engagement, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

Mission Health in Asheville, N.C., implemented a three-pronged approach to improve physician engagement, which increased the number of employees who reported being fully engaged from 17.5 to 40 percent within a year and a half. The first aspect is team engagement. Each team member checks in with the team leader at the beginning of every week. (The team leader is not necessarily a person's supervisor.) The team leader asks each member three things: what the team member needs, what they "loved" about their week, and what they "loathed." In addition, the listed their priorities for the week, and in some cases the team leader offered to help change these if necessary. Finally team members were asked to rate themselves based on how much they contributed last week and how much they worked to their strengths in the last week.

According to the report, the second aspect relates to improving the work environment by eliminating hassles and upscaling the joys of work. Examples of hassles included frustrations from , such as electronic health record systems, as well as more routine hassles, like malfunctioning office equipment.

The final aspect of improving physician engagement relates to helping staff to cultivate an individual resilience approach. The approach uses for resilience by drawing on common practices from other cultures, such as meditation, cultivating gratitude, and engaging in activities beyond the self. In short, the program emphasizes that employees are never left to figure things out on their own.

Explore further: Many highly-engaged employees suffer from burnout

More information: Abstract/Full Text

Related Stories

Many highly-engaged employees suffer from burnout

February 21, 2018
Underlining the danger of job burnout, a new study of more than 1,000 US workers finds that many employees who are highly engaged in their work are also exhausted and ready to leave their organisations.

New workflows have potential to address provider burnout

November 28, 2017
(HealthDay)—New solutions are needed to address burnout among health care team members, yet, in a catch-22 situation for health industry leaders, change fatigue contributes to burnout, according to a Vocera Communications ...

Workflow changes can remove practice hassles

May 23, 2014
(HealthDay)—Physicians can implement workflow strategies that return their focus to patient care, according to an article published May 8 in Medical Economics.

Team approach improves practice efficiency

August 28, 2014
(HealthDay)—The increasing administrative requirements of a medical practice are requiring a team-based approach to care, and physicians must learn to manage the team, according to an article published Aug. 7 in Medical ...

Engaging family in care of hospitalized loved ones enhances healing, reduces readmission rates

February 12, 2018
A voluntary program being spearheaded by Intermountain Healthcare that allows family members of hospitalized patients to participate in their care enhanced healing and reduced readmission rates, according to a new study published ...

Survey: Fees, reimbursement top physician worries

January 11, 2014
(HealthDay)—The results of a new survey show that physicians are concerned about declining reimbursements and increasing administrative hassles, including negotiating with payers, obtaining prior authorizations, and cutting ...

Recommended for you

Dietary fat is good? Dietary fat is bad? Coming to consensus

November 15, 2018
Which is better, a low-fat/high-carbohydrate diet or a high-fat/low-carbohydrate diet—or is it the type of fat that matters? In a new paper featured on the cover of Science magazine's special issue on nutrition, researchers ...

Why we shouldn't like coffee, but we do

November 15, 2018
Why do we like the bitter taste of coffee? Bitterness evolved as a natural warning system to protect the body from harmful substances. By evolutionary logic, we should want to spit it out.

Colder, darker climates increase alcohol consumption and liver disease

November 14, 2018
Where you live could influence how much you drink. According to new research from the University of Pittsburgh Division of Gastroenterology, people living in colder regions with less sunlight drink more alcohol than their ...

Survey reveals how we use music as a possible sleep aid

November 14, 2018
Many individuals use music in the hope that it fights sleep difficulties, according to a study published November 14 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Tabitha Trahan of the University of Sheffield, UK, and colleagues. ...

Want to cut down on your meds? Your pharmacist can help.

November 14, 2018
Pharmacists are pivotal in the process of deprescribing risky medications in seniors, leading many to stop taking unnecessary sleeping pills, anti-inflammatories and other drugs, a new Canadian study has found.

No accounting for these tastes: Artificial flavors a mystery

November 13, 2018
Six artificial flavors are being ordered out of the food supply in a dispute over their safety, but good luck to anyone who wants to know which cookies, candies or drinks they're in.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.