Three-pronged approach can improve physician engagement

March 13, 2018

(HealthDay)—The three-pronged approach implemented by one practice successfully improved physician engagement, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

Mission Health in Asheville, N.C., implemented a three-pronged approach to improve physician engagement, which increased the number of employees who reported being fully engaged from 17.5 to 40 percent within a year and a half. The first aspect is team engagement. Each team member checks in with the team leader at the beginning of every week. (The team leader is not necessarily a person's supervisor.) The team leader asks each member three things: what the team member needs, what they "loved" about their week, and what they "loathed." In addition, the listed their priorities for the week, and in some cases the team leader offered to help change these if necessary. Finally team members were asked to rate themselves based on how much they contributed last week and how much they worked to their strengths in the last week.

According to the report, the second aspect relates to improving the work environment by eliminating hassles and upscaling the joys of work. Examples of hassles included frustrations from , such as electronic health record systems, as well as more routine hassles, like malfunctioning office equipment.

The final aspect of improving physician engagement relates to helping staff to cultivate an individual resilience approach. The approach uses for resilience by drawing on common practices from other cultures, such as meditation, cultivating gratitude, and engaging in activities beyond the self. In short, the program emphasizes that employees are never left to figure things out on their own.

Explore further: Many highly-engaged employees suffer from burnout

More information: Abstract/Full Text

Related Stories

Many highly-engaged employees suffer from burnout

February 21, 2018
Underlining the danger of job burnout, a new study of more than 1,000 US workers finds that many employees who are highly engaged in their work are also exhausted and ready to leave their organisations.

New workflows have potential to address provider burnout

November 28, 2017
(HealthDay)—New solutions are needed to address burnout among health care team members, yet, in a catch-22 situation for health industry leaders, change fatigue contributes to burnout, according to a Vocera Communications ...

Workflow changes can remove practice hassles

May 23, 2014
(HealthDay)—Physicians can implement workflow strategies that return their focus to patient care, according to an article published May 8 in Medical Economics.

Team approach improves practice efficiency

August 28, 2014
(HealthDay)—The increasing administrative requirements of a medical practice are requiring a team-based approach to care, and physicians must learn to manage the team, according to an article published Aug. 7 in Medical ...

Engaging family in care of hospitalized loved ones enhances healing, reduces readmission rates

February 12, 2018
A voluntary program being spearheaded by Intermountain Healthcare that allows family members of hospitalized patients to participate in their care enhanced healing and reduced readmission rates, according to a new study published ...

Survey: Fees, reimbursement top physician worries

January 11, 2014
(HealthDay)—The results of a new survey show that physicians are concerned about declining reimbursements and increasing administrative hassles, including negotiating with payers, obtaining prior authorizations, and cutting ...

Recommended for you

Insufficient sleep, even without extended wakefulness, leads to performance impairments

May 21, 2018
Millions of individuals obtain insufficient sleep on a daily basis, which can lead to impaired performance and other adverse physiological outcomes. To what extent these impairments are caused by the short sleep duration ...

Avoiding the car for travel could significantly lower risk of illness and death

May 21, 2018
People who are more active when commuting to work by walking or cycling could be cutting their relative risk of developing ischaemic heart disease or stroke by 11% and their relative risk of dying from these diseases by 30%, ...

New study shows higher formaldehyde risk in e-cigarettes than previously thought

May 21, 2018
Portland State University researchers who published an article three years ago in the New England Journal of Medicine about the presence of previously undiscovered forms of formaldehyde in e-cigarette vapor revisited their ...

Sleep better, parent better: Study shows link between maternal sleep and permissive parenting

May 21, 2018
Research has shown that consistently not getting enough sleep, or getting poor quality sleep, can put you at risk for a number of health conditions. But how does sleep, or the lack of it, affect how you parent?

Mediterranean diet may blunt air pollution's ill health effects

May 21, 2018
Eating a Mediterranean diet may protect people from some of the harm of long-term exposure to air pollution, and reduce their risk of dying from heart attacks, stroke and other causes of death, according to new research presented ...

Autism is not linked to eating fish in pregnacy

May 21, 2018
A major study examining the fish-eating habits of pregnant women has found that they are not linked to autism or autistic traits in their children.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.