Three-pronged approach can improve physician engagement

March 13, 2018

(HealthDay)—The three-pronged approach implemented by one practice successfully improved physician engagement, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

Mission Health in Asheville, N.C., implemented a three-pronged approach to improve physician engagement, which increased the number of employees who reported being fully engaged from 17.5 to 40 percent within a year and a half. The first aspect is team engagement. Each team member checks in with the team leader at the beginning of every week. (The team leader is not necessarily a person's supervisor.) The team leader asks each member three things: what the team member needs, what they "loved" about their week, and what they "loathed." In addition, the listed their priorities for the week, and in some cases the team leader offered to help change these if necessary. Finally team members were asked to rate themselves based on how much they contributed last week and how much they worked to their strengths in the last week.

According to the report, the second aspect relates to improving the work environment by eliminating hassles and upscaling the joys of work. Examples of hassles included frustrations from , such as electronic health record systems, as well as more routine hassles, like malfunctioning office equipment.

The final aspect of improving physician engagement relates to helping staff to cultivate an individual resilience approach. The approach uses for resilience by drawing on common practices from other cultures, such as meditation, cultivating gratitude, and engaging in activities beyond the self. In short, the program emphasizes that employees are never left to figure things out on their own.

Explore further: Many highly-engaged employees suffer from burnout

More information: Abstract/Full Text

Related Stories

Many highly-engaged employees suffer from burnout

February 21, 2018
Underlining the danger of job burnout, a new study of more than 1,000 US workers finds that many employees who are highly engaged in their work are also exhausted and ready to leave their organisations.

New workflows have potential to address provider burnout

November 28, 2017
(HealthDay)—New solutions are needed to address burnout among health care team members, yet, in a catch-22 situation for health industry leaders, change fatigue contributes to burnout, according to a Vocera Communications ...

Workflow changes can remove practice hassles

May 23, 2014
(HealthDay)—Physicians can implement workflow strategies that return their focus to patient care, according to an article published May 8 in Medical Economics.

Team approach improves practice efficiency

August 28, 2014
(HealthDay)—The increasing administrative requirements of a medical practice are requiring a team-based approach to care, and physicians must learn to manage the team, according to an article published Aug. 7 in Medical ...

Engaging family in care of hospitalized loved ones enhances healing, reduces readmission rates

February 12, 2018
A voluntary program being spearheaded by Intermountain Healthcare that allows family members of hospitalized patients to participate in their care enhanced healing and reduced readmission rates, according to a new study published ...

Survey: Fees, reimbursement top physician worries

January 11, 2014
(HealthDay)—The results of a new survey show that physicians are concerned about declining reimbursements and increasing administrative hassles, including negotiating with payers, obtaining prior authorizations, and cutting ...

Recommended for you

Study compares athlete and truck driver, identical twins

July 20, 2018
When it comes to being fit, are genes or lifestyle—nature or nurture—more important? Researchers at San Francisco State University, CSU Fullerton and Cal Poly, Pomona removed the nature part of the equation by studying ...

Secondhand smoke causing thousands of still births in developing countries

July 20, 2018
The study reveals that more than 40% of all pregnant women in Pakistan are exposed to secondhand smoke—causing approximately 17,000 still births in a year.

Eating iron-fortified grain improves students' attention, memory

July 18, 2018
Adolescent students in a rural school in India who consumed an iron-biofortified version of the grain pearl millet exhibited improved attention and memory compared to those who consumed conventional pearl millet, according ...

Vaping tied to blood clots—in mice

July 18, 2018
A new study involving mice raises another concern about the danger of e-cigarettes in humans after experiments showed that short-term exposure to the device's vapors appeared to increase the risk of clot formation.

Lowering hospitals' Medicare costs proves difficult

July 18, 2018
A payment system that provides financial incentives for hospitals that reduce health-care costs for Medicare patients did not lower costs as intended, according to a new study led by Washington University School of Medicine ...

People who tan in gyms tan more often, and more addictively, than others, new research shows

July 18, 2018
Gyms are places people go to get healthier. But nearly half the gyms in the U.S. contain a potentially addictive carcinogen—tanning beds, report UConn researchers in the July 18 issue of JAMA Dermatology.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.