Can work stress contribute to Parkinson's disease risk?

August 22, 2018, Wiley
Immunohistochemistry for alpha-synuclein showing positive staining (brown) of an intraneural Lewy-body in the Substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease. Credit: Wikipedia

Results from a Movement Disorders study suggest that occupational stress is associated with Parkinson's Disease risk, such that having a high-demand occupation is a risk factor and low control is protective.

High job demands were associated with increased Parkinson's Disease risk among men, especially in men with high education. High control was associated with increased risk among individuals with low education, and this association was more pronounced in women.

The study included 2,544,748 Swedes born in 1920 to 1950. During an average follow-up time of 21.3 years, 21,544 new cases of Parkinson's Disease were identified.

Explore further: Genetic variants linked to higher BMI may be protective against Parkinson disease

More information: Movement Disorders, onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/mds.27439

Related Stories

Genetic variants linked to higher BMI may be protective against Parkinson disease

June 13, 2017
Genetic variants linked to higher body mass index (BMI) are associated with lower risk of Parkinson disease, according to a study published by Nicholas Wood and colleagues from the University College London, UK, in PLOS Medicine.

Is there a link between diabetes and Parkinson's disease?

June 13, 2018
People with type 2 diabetes may have an increased risk of having a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease later in life, according to a large study published in the June 13, 2018, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal ...

A common anti-inflammatory therapy may help reduce risk of developing Parkinson's disease

April 23, 2018
A recent study from researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai provides new insights into a link between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and Parkinson's disease, and may have significant implications for ...

Asthma linked to increased risk of Parkinson's disease

September 4, 2015
(HealthDay)—Patients with asthma may have an increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease, according to a study published online Aug. 27 in Allergy.

Does consuming low-fat dairy increase the risk of Parkinson's disease?

June 7, 2017
Consuming at least three servings of low-fat dairy a day is associated with a greater risk of developing Parkinson's disease compared to consuming less than one serving a day, according to a large study published in the June ...

Depression may increase your risk of Parkinson's disease

October 2, 2013
People who are depressed may have triple the risk of developing Parkinson's disease, according to a study published in the October 2, 2013, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Recommended for you

Scalpel-free surgery enhances quality of life for Parkinson's patients, study finds

November 9, 2018
A high-tech form of brain surgery that replaces scalpels with sound waves improved quality of life for people with Parkinson's disease that has resisted other forms of treatment, a new study has found.

Scientists overturn odds to make Parkinson's discovery

November 7, 2018
Scientists at the University of Dundee have confirmed that a key cellular pathway that protects the brain from damage is disrupted in Parkinson's patients, raising the possibility of new treatments for the disease.

Singing may reduce stress, improve motor function for people with Parkinson's disease

November 7, 2018
Singing may provide benefits beyond improving respiratory and swallow control in people with Parkinson's disease, according to new data from Iowa State University researchers.

Road to cell death more clearly identified for Parkinson's disease

November 1, 2018
In experiments performed in mice, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have identified the cascade of cell death events leading to the physical and intellectual degeneration associated with Parkinson's disease.

Appendix removal is linked to lower risk of Parkinson's

October 31, 2018
Scientists have found a new clue that Parkinson's disease may get its start not in the brain but in the gut—maybe in the appendix.

Cooling 'brains on fire' to treat Parkinson's

October 31, 2018
A promising new therapy to stop Parkinson's disease in its tracks has been developed at The University of Queensland.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.