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Presentations from the American College of Gastroenterology annual meeting

American college of gastroenterology, oct. 20-25

The annual meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology was held from Oct. 20 to 25 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, and attracted participants from around the world, including gastroenterology and digestive disease specialists and other health care professionals. The conference featured presentations focusing on clinical updates in gastroenterology and hepatology as well as the latest advances in digestive health and gastrointestinal disorders.

In one study, Wissam Ghusn, M.D., of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and colleagues found that the use of semaglutide for obesity results in significant weight loss outcomes and decreases the atherosclerosis (ASCVD) risk of patients with obesity.

In a multicenter retrospective study of patients with a ≥27 kg/m2, 10-year ASCVD risk at baseline and one year after semaglutide initiation was calculated. The researchers observed a decrease in 10-year ASCVD risk, from 7.6 to 6.3%, after one year of semaglutide use. Decreases were also seen for (by 9.3/4.9 mm Hg), total cholesterol (by 9.5 mg/dL), (by 6.6 mg/dL), triglycerides (by 23.0 mg/dL), fasting glucose (by 23 mg/dL), and hemoglobin A1c (by 0.72%).

"Considering the fact that patients with obesity are more prone to develop cardiovascular diseases, this medication is able to target both obesity and cardiovascular health, improving health care outcomes in terms of morbidity and mortality," Ghusn said.

In another study, Yuhan Fu, D.O., of the University of Louisville in Kentucky, and colleagues found that combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are associated with an increased risk for developing new-onset irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

In a population-based cohort study, the authors used TriNetX, a global federated research network, to assess a group of women, aged 15 to 45 years, who received COCs before 2018 and a control group of age-matched women who received copper intrauterine device insertion before 2018. The researchers found that patients who were prescribed COCs had higher risks for developing new-onset IBS and its subtypes, including IBS with predominant constipation, IBS with predominant diarrhea, and IBS with mixed bowel habits.

"COCs are associated with higher risks of developing IBS and its subtypes," the authors write. "Further research would be necessary to elucidate the role of estrogen and progesterone on the development and progression of IBS."

Amy Yu, M.D., of the University of California in San Francisco, and colleagues found that the use of low-dose aspirin (LDA) among with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) for prevention of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) is not associated with an increased risk for disease flare.

The authors evaluated all patients with IBD and at least one pregnancy at a maternal fetal medicine clinic between January 2013 and December 2022. The researchers found that approximately one-third of patients with IBD used LDA for prevention of HDP; however, there was no change in the observed rate of IBD flare during pregnancy or postpartum between those who did or did not use LDA.

"Overall, the use of LDA among pregnant women with IBD was not associated with an increased risk of disease activity," the authors write.

ACG: Noninvasive multitarget stool RNA test has high sensitivity for CRC

A noninvasive, multitarget stool RNA test has high sensitivity for detecting colorectal neoplasia, according to a study published online Oct. 23 in the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with the annual meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology, held from Oct. 20 to 25 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

ACG: Combined oral contraceptives increase risk for irritable bowel syndrome

Combined are associated with higher risks for developing and its subtypes, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology, held from Oct. 20 to 25 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

ACG: Intestinal ultrasound monitoring cuts time to treatment change in IBD

For patients with inflammatory bowel disease, monitoring by intestinal ultrasound results in reduced time to treatment change and to remission, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology, held from Oct. 20 to 25 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

ACG: Prophylactic low-dose aspirin in pregnancy does not increase IBD activity

Use of low-dose aspirin among pregnant women with is not associated with an increased risk for disease activity, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology, held from Oct. 20 to 25 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

ACG: Digital risk assessment tool can ID risk for cancer susceptibility syndromes

Implementation of a digital risk assessment tool can identify patients with high-risk cancer susceptibility syndromes, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology, held from Oct. 20 to 25 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

More information: Abstract No. P2613
Abstract No. P1950
Abstract No. Oral 30
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