Cancer

Cancers 'change spots' to avoid immunotherapy

Cancers can make themselves harder for new immunotherapies to see by 'changing their spots' - and switching off a key molecule on the surface of cells that is otherwise recognised by treatment.

Cancer

Is your melanoma hot enough for immunotherapy?

Melanomas tend to be "hot" or "cold—if they're hot, immunotherapy lights melanoma tumors like beacons for elimination by the immune system; but 40-50 percent of melanomas are cold, making them invisible to the immune system, ...

Cancer

Major step towards individual cancer immunotherapy

Medicine has great hopes for personalised cancer immunotherapy. The idea is to have a vaccine prompt the immune system to fight a tumour. Scientists at ETH Zurich have developed a method that allows them to determine which ...

Cancer

Harnessing T-cell 'stemness' could enhance cancer immunotherapy

A new study led by scientists in the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sheds light on one way tumors may continue to grow despite the presence of cancer-killing immune cells. The findings, ...

Cancer

Glowing tumors show scientists where cancer drugs are working

Experimenting with mice, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have successfully used positron emission tomography (PET) scans to calculate in real time how much of an immunotherapy drug reaches a tumor and what parts of ...

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