Leukemia

Adding rituximab to chemo ups event-free survival in ALL

(HealthDay)—For young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), adding rituximab to chemotherapy is associated with increased event-free survival, according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of the New England ...

Sep 20, 2016
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Immunotherapy a hot topic in treating cancers

Last Friday was Rebecca Hertzog Burns' birthday. She turned 2. She says that's her age, though she's really 27. After a relapse in her fight with acute myelogenous leukemia, Burns received a stem cell transplant on Sept. ...

Sep 15, 2016
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At bat against rare blood cancers

At 38-years-old, Aaron Feldman was in the best shape of his life. He played first base and pitched in two competitive baseball leagues and hit the gym daily. He attributed the pain in his chest to soreness from grueling workouts. ...

Sep 20, 2016
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Leukemia (American English) or leukaemia (British English) (from the Greek leukos λεύκος - white, and haima αίμα - blood) is a type of cancer of the blood or bone marrow characterized by an abnormal increase of immature white blood cells called "blasts". Leukemia is a broad term covering a spectrum of diseases. In turn, it is part of the even broader group of diseases affecting the blood, bone marrow, heart, and lymphoid system, which are all known as hematological neoplasms. Leukemia can also cause multiple organ failure.

In 2000, approximately 256,000 children and adults around the world developed some form of leukemia, and 209,000 died from it.[citation needed]

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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