Diet rich in unsaturated fat may up insulin sensitivity

Diet rich in unsaturated fat may up insulin sensitivity
A diet rich in unsaturated fat may increase insulin sensitivity in individuals who are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease, according to research published in the May issue of Diabetes Care.

(HealthDay)—A diet rich in unsaturated fat may increase insulin sensitivity in individuals who are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease, according to research published in the May issue of Diabetes Care.

Meghana D. Gadgil, M.D., M.P.H., of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, and colleagues enrolled 164 individuals with or stage 1 hypertension, without diabetes, in a randomized, controlled, three-period, crossover feeding study. The three diets studied were a carbohydrate-rich diet (similar to the [DASH] diet), a protein-rich diet (predominantly from plant sources), and an unsaturated fat-rich diet (mostly monounsaturated fat). The primary outcome was calculation of the quantitative check index (QUICKI), a validated measure of insulin sensitivity.

At baseline, the researchers noted a mean of 30.2 kg/m² and a mean QUICKI of 0.35. The increase in QUICKI (0.005) was significantly greater with the unsaturated fat-rich diet compared with the carbohydrate-rich diet. The protein-rich diet had no significant effect on insulin sensitivity compared with the carbohydrate-rich diet.

"Our analysis suggests that a diet rich in unsaturated fats, which is commonplace in Mediterranean-style diets, improves insulin sensitivity in a population at risk for cardiovascular disease," the authors write.

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alfie_null
Jun 16, 2013
I wonder if any of the participants gained or lost weight during the study?

Cynically, I was wondering: how soon before we see Olive Oil pills on the market, but - too late, they're here already. I guess what someone needs to do is run a study of the effects of loading a Mediterranean diet on top of what ever junk some group is already consuming.

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