Cancer

New combination treatment flips the switch on melanoma cells

Think of the protein BH3 like a finger that turns off a cancer cell survival switch. The problem is that most cancer cells have found ways to remove this "finger—commonly, by breaking the action of a gene called p53 that ...

Cancer

Cancer immunotherapy uses melanin against melanoma

Researchers have developed a melanin-enhanced cancer immunotherapy technique that can also serve as a vaccine, based on early experiments done in a mouse model. The technique is applied via a transdermal patch.

Cancer

Compound shows promise in treating melanoma

While past attempts to treat melanoma failed to meet expectations, an international team of researchers are hopeful that a compound they tested on both mice and on human cells in a petri dish takes a positive step toward ...

Cancer

Melanoma—taming a migratory menace

The deadliest cancer of the skin is cutaneous melanoma. In 2017 over 160,000 Americans are expected to be diagnosed with melanoma, and over half will have invasive disease, or one that has gone beyond the skin and which carries ...

Cancer

Fishing for new leads in a rare melanoma

Zebrafish are an emerging power tool in cancer research. They can be engineered to light up when certain genes turn on—capturing the moment when a cancer is initiated. Because they breed so quickly, they lend themselves ...

Cancer

New driver, target in advanced mucosal melanoma

Not all melanomas are created equal. While most melanomas appear on the skin as the result of sun exposure, a small subset of melanomas arise spontaneously from mucosal tissues. And while targeted treatments and immunotherapies ...

Cancer

Lung cancer driver ALK-fusion found in melanoma

Melanomas caused by sun exposure have been matched with targeted treatments and immunotherapies, in many cases dramatically extending patients' lives. However, there are other kinds of melanoma not related to sun exposure ...

Cancer

Pregnancy does not increase expectant mothers' melanoma risk

Expectant mothers need not be concerned that they are more prone to develop melanoma, or will have a worse prognosis if they do get this serious skin cancer, than women who are not pregnant, according to study results published ...

Cancer

Targeting MC1R in metastatic melanoma

In 1960, scientists described the "Philadelphia chromosome" that causes chronic myeloid leukemia, and in 2001 the Food and Drug Administration approved the drug imatinib to disable the action of this cancer-causing genetic ...

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