Psychology & Psychiatry

Chronic opioid treatment may increase PTSD risk

Long-term (chronic) treatment with opioids, such as morphine, prior to trauma enhances fear learning in mice, according to a study published in Neuropsychopharmacology. The findings, which link chronic opioid treatment before ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Do we actually grow from adversity?

In our culture, there's this idea that enduring a tragedy can be good for your personal growth. You'll have a newfound appreciation for life. You'll be grateful for your friends and family. You'll learn from the experience. ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

The origins of trypophobia

Julia was around 11 the first time it happened. She let herself into her dad's apartment in Malmö, Sweden, dropped her schoolbag and flopped on to the sofa.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Researchers discover new pathways in brain's amygdala

Researchers at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) are pioneering an innovative brain study that sheds light on how the amygdala portion of the brain functions and could contribute to a better understanding of post-traumatic ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Study calls for improved mental health support

A government scheme to support the mental health of people affected by terrorist attacks needs to provide a better system of immediate psychological help, according to research led by the Care Policy and Evaluation Centre ...

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Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a severe anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to any event that results in psychological trauma. This event may involve the threat of death to oneself or to someone else, or to one's own or someone else's physical, sexual, or psychological integrity, overwhelming the individual's ability to cope. As an effect of psychological trauma, PTSD is less frequent and more enduring than the more commonly seen acute stress response. Diagnostic symptoms for PTSD include re-experiencing the original trauma(s) through flashbacks or nightmares, avoidance of stimuli associated with the trauma, and increased arousal—such as difficulty falling or staying asleep, anger, and hypervigilance. Formal diagnostic criteria (both DSM-IV-TR and ICD-10) require that the symptoms last more than one month and cause significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

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