Researchers publish promising findings for advanced cervical cancer

February 9, 2010, University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Researchers at the Ireland Cancer Center of University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center, have published new findings that may lead to a new standard of care for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer.

Published in the February issue of Clinical Research, the phase one study found that a new chemotherapy medicine, Triapine, was well tolerated in combination with standard-of-care cisplatin chemotherapy and radiation treatment in women with . This regimen provided both significant reduction in cancer disease and cancer control.

"This new drug, which suppresses , shows a great deal of promise for cervical cancer patients who are at high risk for relapse and cancer-related death," says Charles Kunos, MD, Primary Investigator of the study, Director of Gynecologic at UH Case Medical Center and Assistant Professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. "In this ten-patient study, a 100% complete response rate was observed and no disease progression was documented through 18 months of median follow-up."

In the study, patients were treated three times weekly with Triapine in combination with weekly cisplatin treatment and daily pelvic over five weeks. A phase two follow-up study is ongoing at the Ireland Cancer Center. UH Case Medical Center is the primary affiliate of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, a nationally recognized leader in medical research and education

"Cervical cancer affects half a million women worldwide each year," says Steven Waggoner, MD, Chief of Gynecologic Oncology at UH Case Medical Center and Assistant Professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. "We are pleased to have found a promising new treatment to help women fight this aggressive disease."

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