A new radiotherapy technique significantly reduces irradiation of healthy tissue

February 24, 2012

Researchers at the University of Granada and the university hospital Virgen de las Nieves in Granada have developed a new radiotherapy technique that is much less toxic than that traditionally used and only targets cancerous tissue.

This new protocol provides a less invasive but equally efficient cancer postoperative treatment for cases of cancer of the and pharynx.

The study -conducted between 2005 and 2008- included 80 patients diagnosed with epidermoid cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx, who had undergone lymph node removal. The affected nodes were located by the surgeon during the intervention and classified into different risk levels. Classification allowed physicians to target the areas at a higher risk of . This way, neck areas at a lower risk of containing residual cancer cells were not irradiated. Researchers achieved both to minimize the side effects of radiotherapy, and to reduce treatment discontinuation, thus achieving the therapy to be more effective.

A Highly Toxic Treatment

Over 70% of oral and pharynx cancer treated with surgery require supplementary treatment with radiotherapy occasionally associated to chemotherapy, because of the high risk for recurrence and spread through the . Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are highly toxic, mainly due to the of the lining the oral cavity; toxicity leads may patients to stop the treatment, which significantly reduces the chances of cure.

By using the risk map obtained with the collaboration of the surgeon and the pathologist, an individualized treatment was designed and adapted to the specific of recurrence in each neck area. The volume of tissue irradiated was significantly smaller than that usually irradiated with traditional techniques.

This trial was led by the at the university hospital Virgen de las Nieves, Miguel Martínez Carrillo, and conducted in collaboration with the Services of Radiation Oncology, Medical Physics, Maxillofacial Surgery and Pathology of the university hospital Virgen de las Nieves, and the University of Granada Department of Radiology and Physical Medicine

After a three-year follow up, using this new technique, scientists achieved to reduce the volume of irradiated tissue in 44% of patients. By this new technique, irradiation of an average volume of 118 cc of tissue was avoided. A total of 95% of patients completed radiotherapy and presented significantly lower toxicity than patients treated with the traditional technique. Recurrence rates did not increase.

This study was coordinated by University of Granada professors Rosario del Moral Ávila and José Mariano Ruiz de Almodóvar Rivera. The results of this study will be published in the next issue of the journal Radiation Oncology.

Explore further: Certain head and neck cancer patients benefit from second round of treatment

Related Stories

Certain head and neck cancer patients benefit from second round of treatment

June 13, 2011
A new study has determined predictors that can better identify patients who will benefit from a potentially toxic second course of treatment, which offers a small but real chance of cure in select patients with head and neck ...

Radiation at time of lumpectomy may offer faster, more precise treatment for breast cancer patients

April 12, 2011
Northwestern Medicine physicians are currently utilizing a new treatment option for breast cancer that allows women to receive a full dose of radiation therapy during breast conserving surgery. Traditionally, women who opt ...

Recommended for you

Study may explain failure of retinoic acid trials against breast cancer

July 25, 2017
Estrogen-positive breast cancers are often treated with anti-estrogen therapies. But about half of these cancers contain a subpopulation of cells marked by the protein cytokeratin 5 (CK5), which resists treatment—and breast ...

Physical activity could combat fatigue, cognitive decline in cancer survivors

July 25, 2017
A new study indicates that cancer patients and survivors have a ready weapon against fatigue and "chemo brain": a brisk walk.

Breaking the genetic resistance of lung cancer and melanoma

July 25, 2017
Researchers from Monash University and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC, New York) have discovered why some cancers – particularly lung cancer and melanoma – are able to quickly develop deadly resistance ...

New therapeutic approach for difficult-to-treat subtype of ovarian cancer identified

July 24, 2017
A potential new therapeutic strategy for a difficult-to-treat form of ovarian cancer has been discovered by Wistar scientists. The findings were published online in Nature Cell Biology.

Immune cells the missing ingredient in new bladder cancer treatment

July 24, 2017
New research offers a possible explanation for why a new type of cancer treatment hasn't been working as expected against bladder cancer.

Anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent inhibits glioblastoma growth and radiation resistance

July 24, 2017
Glioblastoma is a primary brain tumor with dismal survival rates, even after treatment with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. A small subpopulation of tumor cells—glioma stem cells—is responsible for glioblastoma's ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.