Dysphagia not tied to post-anterior cervical op swelling

October 7, 2012
Dysphagia not tied to post-anterior cervical op swelling
Although significant soft-tissue swelling can occur after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion procedures, the width of the prevertebral soft-tissue swelling on radiographic analysis does not correlate with the severity of postoperative dysphagia, according to research published in the August issue of The Spine Journal.

(HealthDay)—Although significant soft-tissue swelling can occur after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) procedures, the width of the prevertebral soft-tissue swelling on radiographic analysis does not correlate with the severity of postoperative dysphagia, according to research published in the August issue of The Spine Journal.

To examine whether anterior soft-tissue swelling is greater in patients with postoperative , Christopher K. , M.D., M.B.A., of the Rothman Institute/ University in Philadelphia, and colleagues conducted a prospective, cohort study involving 43 patients who had undergone one- or two-level ACDF using allograft bone and anterior instrumentation. Dysphagia was assessed before and after surgery using a questionnaire which included a dysphagia numeric rating scale (DNRS).

The researchers found a significant increase in the anterior soft-tissue shadow width at all levels, with the exception of C1 at two weeks and C1 and C2 at six weeks. Two weeks after surgery, 18 patients had no symptoms or only mild dysphagia (average DNRS, 1.1) and 25 patients experienced moderate-to-severe dysphagia (average DNRS, 5.3). Compared with those with little or no dysphagia, patients with more severe dysphagia did not display any significant differences in soft-tissue measurements at any level, on radiographic analysis. No correlation was found at any time point between the DNRS and the width of anterior soft-tissue swelling.

"Despite the common perception that soft-tissue swelling plays a prominent role in the of dysphagia after ACDF, we found no objective evidence of greater soft-tissue shadow width in patients with moderate or significant postoperative dysphagia in comparison to patients without symptoms or with only mild complaints of difficulty swallowing," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed to the medical device industry.

Explore further: Fluticasone improves histologic eosinophilia in esophagitis

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Fluticasone improves histologic eosinophilia in esophagitis

June 29, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Swallowing aerosolized fluticasone improves histologic eosinophilia but does not improve dysphagia symptoms in adults with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), according to a study published online in the July issue ...

Electrical brain stimulation can alleviate swallowing disorders after stroke

July 2, 2012
After stroke, patients often suffer from dysphagia, a swallowing disorder that results in greater healthcare costs and higher rates of complications such as dehydration, malnutrition, and pneumonia. In a new study published ...

Recommended for you

Pickled in 'cognac', Chopin's heart gives up its secrets

November 26, 2017
The heart of Frederic Chopin, among the world's most cherished musical virtuosos, may finally have given up the cause of his untimely death.

Sugar industry withheld evidence of sucrose's health effects nearly 50 years ago

November 21, 2017
A U.S. sugar industry trade group appears to have pulled the plug on a study that was producing animal evidence linking sucrose to disease nearly 50 years ago, researchers argue in a paper publishing on November 21 in the ...

Female researchers pay more attention to sex and gender in medicine

November 7, 2017
When women participate in a medical research paper, that research is more likely to take into account the differences between the way men and women react to diseases and treatments, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejection

August 3, 2017
An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...

Team eradicates hepatitis C in 10 patients following lifesaving transplants from infected donors

April 30, 2017
Ten patients at Penn Medicine have been cured of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving kidney transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease. The findings point to new strategies for increasing ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.