Ease into a workout program to prevent injuries

January 12, 2014
Ease into a workout program to prevent injuries
Doctors give safety tips for weight-lifting and other regimens.

(HealthDay)—If your New Year's resolution was to get in shape, you should ease into your exercise program, an expert warns. Trying to get quick results could do more harm than good.

"It's important to know and respect your body's limits," Dr. Joshua Harris, an with Houston Methodist Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, in Texas, said in a news release. "Start with an that will slowly build your strength and endurance."

Nearly 500,000 workout-related injuries occur each year in the United States, according to the news release. Major causes include people wanting to do too much too fast and overusing their muscles, as well as poor technique during and other exercise regimens.

For weight-lifting workouts, Harris recommended starting with a light- to moderate-intensity workout three times a week. The focus should be on high-repetition, low-weight sets that emphasize larger muscle groups, including the shoulders, hips, pelvis and core.

It's crucial to use good form when lifting weights, said Dr. Shari Liberman, a hand and upper extremity specialist at Houston Methodist Orthopedics.

"In January, I see an increase in patients with wrist sprains and other hand injuries caused by improper weight-lifting," Liberman said in the news release.

"Keep your wrist straight when lifting weights," she said. "Many people tend to bend the wrist in or let it fall back, which can increase their risk of a sprain or other ."

It's a good idea to work with a personal trainer for a few weight-lifting sessions to help you develop good form for your wrists and back, Liberman said. She also suggested switching among workout routines.

"Rotating routines helps prevent and increases overall fitness because of the use of many different muscles," she said. "For example, do yoga on Monday, running on Wednesday and weight-lifting on Friday."

Overuse injuries also can be prevented by increasing your flexibility, so you should stretch after every workout, Harris said.

"It's important to pay attention to workouts," he said. "Study good form and let muscles rest. It might take a little longer to get results, but in the end it will prevent injuries."

Explore further: Luggage-lifting tips for safe travels

More information: The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has more about safe exercise.

Related Stories

Luggage-lifting tips for safe travels

December 21, 2013
(HealthDay)—Carrying and lifting heavy luggage during the holidays can lead to neck, wrist, back and shoulder pain and injuries unless you take proper safety precautions, an orthopedic surgeon says.

Orthopedic spine surgeon gives advice on avoiding workout injuries

December 31, 2013
Those fitness resolutions will do you no good if they lead you to visit the likes of Hooman Melamed.

Ease up on workouts to aid flu recovery, expert says

January 9, 2014
(HealthDay)—Exercising when you have a cold or the flu can cause more harm than good in some cases, an expert warns.

Building muscle without heavy weights

April 26, 2012
Weight training at a lower intensity but with more repetitions may be as effective for building muscle as lifting heavy weights says a new opinion piece in Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism.

Backpack safety tips for back to school

August 18, 2013
(HealthDay)—As the start of a new school year approaches, parents need to think about the comfort and safety of their children's backpacks, an expert says.

Recommended for you

Brain disease seen in most football players in large report

July 25, 2017
Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school.

Safety of medical devices not often evaluated by sex, age, or race

July 25, 2017
Researchers at Yale and the University of California-San Francisco have found that few medical devices are analyzed to consider the influence of their users' sex, age, or race on safety and effectiveness.

Why you should consider more than looks when choosing a fitness tracker

July 25, 2017
A UNSW study of five popular physical activity monitors, including Fitbit and Jawbone models, has found their accuracy differs with the speed of activity, and where they are worn.

Dog walking could be key to ensuring activity in later life

July 24, 2017
A new study has shown that regularly walking a dog boosts levels of physical activity in older people, especially during the winter.

Alcohol to claim 63,000 lives over next five years, experts warn

July 24, 2017
Alcohol consumption will cause 63,000 deaths in England over the next five years – the equivalent of 35 deaths a day – according to a new report from the University of Sheffield Alcohol Research Group.

Alcohol boosts recall of earlier learning

July 24, 2017
Drinking alcohol improves memory for information learned before the drinking episode began, new research suggests.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.