New X-ray imaging developed by scientists

August 15, 2014, Monash University

Scientists have developed an x-ray imaging system that enables researchers to see 'live' how effective treatments are for cystic fibrosis.

Published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, the imaging method allows researchers to monitor the effectiveness of a treatment for the life-threatening genetic disorder.

Cystic fibrosis affects many of the body's systems, but most severely the lungs, and currently it can take several months to measure how effective treatment is for the early-fatal disease.

Dr Kaye Morgan, lead researcher on the paper from Monash University, said the new x-ray imaging method allows researchers to look at soft tissue structures, for example the brain, airways and lungs, which are effectively invisible in conventional x-ray images.

"At the moment we typically need to wait for a treatment to have an effect on lung health, measured by either a lung CT scan or breath measurement, to see how effective that treatment is," Dr Morgan said.

"However the new imaging method allows us for the first time to non-invasively see how the treatment is working 'live' on the airway surface."

Dr Morgan said this x-ray imaging method would enable doctors and researchers to measure how effective treatments are, and progress new treatments to the clinic at a much quicker rate, a key goal of co-authors Dr Martin Donnelley and Dr David Parsons of the CF Gene Therapy group at the Women's and Children's Hospital and the University of Adelaide's Robinson Research Institute.

"Because we will be able to see how effectively treatments are working straight away, we'll be able to develop new treatments a lot more quickly, and help better treat people with cystic fibrosis," Dr Morgan said.

Dr Morgan said the new imaging method, which was developed using a synchrotron x-ray source, may also open up possibilities in assessing how effective treatments were for other lung, heart and brain diseases.

Explore further: Scientist makes major cystic fibrosis breakthrough

Related Stories

Scientist makes major cystic fibrosis breakthrough

June 26, 2014
A Queen's University doctor has played a key role in a major breakthrough to change the lives of cystic fibrosis sufferers.

Study finds that people with cystic fibrosis who live in deprived areas have worse health

January 29, 2013
A study by the University of Liverpool has found that people with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) who live in deprived areas have worse growth and lung function than people living in more advantaged areas.

X-ray dark-field radiography provides detailed imaging of lung diseases

May 27, 2014
Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München (HMGU) working in cooperation with the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Hospital (KUM) and the Technischen Universität München (TUM) tested for the first time X-ray dark-field ...

FDA approves lung preservation machine (Update)

August 12, 2014
Federal health regulators have approved a novel device that can preserve donated lungs outside the body for possible transplantation into critically ill patients.

Breakthrough could give new hope to sufferers of Cystic Fibrosis

August 12, 2014
Cystic Fibrosis is a devastating genetic disease which afflicts over 10,000 children across the country. The disease results in a declining lung function, which in turn leads to a higher likelihood of developing lung infections. ...

Finding might hold answer to preventing lung disease in cystic fibrosis

May 27, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—Researchers at the Institute, Queensland Children's Medical Research Institute (QCMRI), and the Telethon institute for Child Health Research, Perth; are one step closer to preventing serious lung disease ...

Recommended for you

Researchers illustrate how muscle growth inhibitor is activated, could aid in treating ALS

January 19, 2018
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine are part of an international team that has identified how the inactive or latent form of GDF8, a signaling protein also known as myostatin responsible for ...

Bioengineered soft microfibers improve T-cell production

January 18, 2018
T cells play a key role in the body's immune response against pathogens. As a new class of therapeutic approaches, T cells are being harnessed to fight cancer, promising more precise, longer-lasting mitigation than traditional, ...

Weight flux alters molecular profile, study finds

January 17, 2018
The human body undergoes dramatic changes during even short periods of weight gain and loss, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Secrets of longevity protein revealed in new study

January 17, 2018
Named after the Greek goddess who spun the thread of life, Klotho proteins play an important role in the regulation of longevity and metabolism. In a recent Yale-led study, researchers revealed the three-dimensional structure ...

The HLF gene protects blood stem cells by maintaining them in a resting state

January 17, 2018
The HLF gene is necessary for maintaining blood stem cells in a resting state, which is crucial for ensuring normal blood production. This has been shown by a new research study from Lund University in Sweden published in ...

Magnetically applied MicroRNAs could one day help relieve constipation

January 17, 2018
Constipation is an underestimated and debilitating medical issue related to the opioid epidemic. As a growing concern, researchers look to new tools to help patients with this side effect of opioid use and aging.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.