Psychology & Psychiatry

Antidepressants may reduce anxiety more than depressive symptoms

One of the most common antidepressants, sertraline, leads to an early reduction in anxiety symptoms, commonly found in depression, several weeks before any improvement in depressive symptoms, a UCL-led clinical trial has ...

Neuroscience

How gut bacteria negatively influences blood sugar levels

Millions of people around the world experience serious blood sugar problems which can cause diabetes, but a world first study is revealing how gut bacteria impact the normally feel good hormone serotonin to negatively influence ...

Neuroscience

Why do some people stop breathing after seizures?

Could a chemical produced by the brain that regulates mood, sleep and breathing also be protective in people with epilepsy? New research has found that higher levels of serotonin in the blood after a seizure are linked to ...

Neuroscience

How a popular antidepressant drug could rewire the brain

Prozac, the trade name for the drug fluoxetine, was introduced to the U.S. market for the treatment of depression in 1988. Thirty years later, scientists still don't know exactly how the medication exerts its mood-lifting ...

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Serotonin

"Serotonin" redirects here. For the professional wrestling stable, see Serotonin.

Serotonin (pronounced /ˌsɛrəˈtoʊnən/) is a monoamine neurotransmitter. It is found extensively in the gastrointestinal tract of animals, and about 80 to 90 percent of the human body's total serotonin is located in the enterochromaffin cells in the gut, where it is used to regulate intestinal movements. The remainder is synthesized in serotonergic neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) where it has various functions, including control of appetite, mood and anger.

Serotonin is found not only in animals, but also in fungi and plants, including fruits and vegetables.

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