Autism spectrum disorders

Scientists pinpoint pathway that impacts features of autism

A team of scientists at Florida Atlantic University has uncovered a brain-signaling pathway that can be pharmacologically manipulated in genetically engineered mice to reverse an autism-related pathway. Using an investigational ...

Neuroscience

Scientists tie specific brain circuit to sociability in mice

Social behavior in mouse models of autism spectrum disorder normalized when investigators triggered the release of a specific signaling substance, serotonin, in a single part of the animals' brains, according to a study from ...

Genetics

Science of romantic relationships includes gene factor

(Medical Xpress)—Adolescents worry about passing tests, winning games, lost phones, fractured bones—and whether or not they will ever really fall in love. Three Chinese researchers have focused on that last question. ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Happiness and the evolution of brain size

During human evolution, the size of the brain increased, especially in a particular part called the neocortex. The neocortex enables us to speak, dream and think. In search of the causes underlying neocortex expansion, researchers ...

Neuroscience

Imagery reveals autism-related brain differences

People with autism spectrum disorder have lower levels of a protein that regulates the amount of serotonin in the brain, a paper from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry reports. ...

page 1 from 39

Serotonin

"Serotonin" redirects here. For the professional wrestling stable, see Serotonin.

Serotonin (pronounced /ˌsɛrəˈtoʊnən/) is a monoamine neurotransmitter. It is found extensively in the gastrointestinal tract of animals, and about 80 to 90 percent of the human body's total serotonin is located in the enterochromaffin cells in the gut, where it is used to regulate intestinal movements. The remainder is synthesized in serotonergic neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) where it has various functions, including control of appetite, mood and anger.

Serotonin is found not only in animals, but also in fungi and plants, including fruits and vegetables.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA