Researchers identify genes related to vitiligo

For the past decade, Richard Spritz's lab at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus has been searching for potential causes of vitiligo, an autoimmune disease that gives rise to patches of white skin and hair.

Oct 10, 2016
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Estrogen signaling impacted immune response in cancer

While the role of estrogen signaling in tumor development is well understood in breast and ovarian cancer, its role in anti-tumor immunity has not been extensively studied. However, new research from The Wistar Institute ...

Oct 17, 2016
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Melanoma i/ˌmɛləˈnoʊmə/ (from Greek μέλας - melas, "dark") is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Melanocytes are cells that produce the dark pigment, melanin, which is responsible for the color of skin. They predominantly occur in skin, but are also found in other parts of the body, including the bowel and the eye (see uveal melanoma). Melanoma can occur in any part of the body that contains melanocytes.

Melanoma is less common than other skin cancers. However, it is much more dangerous and causes the majority (75%) of deaths related to skin cancer. Worldwide, doctors diagnose about 160,000 new cases of melanoma yearly. The diagnosis is more frequent in women than in men and is particularly common among Caucasians living in sunny climates, with high rates of incidence in Australia, New Zealand, North America, Latin America, and northern Europe. According to a WHO report, about 48,000 melanoma related deaths occur worldwide per year.

The treatment includes surgical removal of the tumor, adjuvant treatment, chemo- and immunotherapy, or radiation therapy. The chance of a cure is greatest when the tumor is discovered while it is still small and thin, and can be entirely removed surgically.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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