Melanoma

New therapy wipes out cervical cancer in two women

Aricca Wallace knew she was nearly out of time. For more than three years, she had suffered cramping and irregular bleeding, which her doctor thought was a side effect of her birth control implant, known ...

Jun 02, 2014
popularity 4.8 / 5 (17) | comments 0

Cancer immunotherapy on the cusp

Glass crystals with thread-like filaments floating inside sit in the offices of two prominent immunologists. The clear blocks encase models of the structure of PD-1/PD-L1, a receptor-ligand pair that rides ...

Sep 08, 2014
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Blocking STAT3 could help cancer patients in two ways

The STAT transcription factors are involved in the development of many forms of cancer. STAT3 is frequently activated in tumour cells, so drugs targeting STAT3 could be used in cancer therapy. However, STAT3 ...

Oct 10, 2014
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Experimental drug helps body fight advanced melanoma

(HealthDay)—An experimental drug that harnesses the power of the body's immune system to fight cancer has helped some patients with advanced melanoma keep their disease in check for several years, a new ...

Mar 03, 2014
popularity 4.6 / 5 (5) | comments 0

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Rewiring cell metabolism slows colorectal cancer growth

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Can parents make their kids smarter?

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Toddlers copy their peers to fit in, but apes don't

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Could daylight savings time be a risk to diabetics?

Soon, many will turn back the hands of time as part of the twice-annual ritual of daylight savings time. That means remembering to change the alarm clock next to the bed, which will mean an extra hour of ...