Teens' ability to consider the intentions of others linked to structural changes in the brain

September 13, 2017

When it comes to the concept of fairness, teenagers' ability to consider the intentions of others appears to be linked to structural changes underway in the brain, according to a Dartmouth-led study published by Scientific Reports. The study is the first to provide evidence linking structural changes with behavioral changes within this context. Understanding the intentions of others is fundamental to human cooperation and how we exist as social beings.

Understanding the intentions of others is fundamental to and how we exist as social beings. Previous studies have demonstrated that certain areas of the social brain relating to how we care about others or "social inference," continue to undergo cortical development until late adolescence. As demonstrated by the following time-lapse video, these changes include the thinning of the brain's cortex, which likely reflect synaptic reorganization in how brain regions are connected and communicate with each other. The study is the first to provide evidence linking structural changes with in the brain within the context of fairness concerns.

For the study, participants between nine and 23-years old took part in an ultimatum game based on the exchange of money. Proposers first selected between two different divisions of $10, and responders then decided whether to accept or reject the chosen division. Researchers evaluated how participants used two different cognitive strategies when making their decision using computational modeling, and then investigated how these processes correlated with measurements of participants' cortical thickness, as obtained through (MRI).

The video will load shortly.
This video shows changes in cortical thickness across adolescence. Credit: Sunhae Sul.

Younger players tended to want to minimize the difference in the division of the money, whereby everyone gets the same amount but as players became older, they were more inclined to consider the other player's intentions. This shift from a simple rule-based egalitarian strategy to a more sophisticated strategy that considers both the other player's intentions and notions of reciprocity, was observed during late adolescence. This gradual shift coincided with cortical thinning in the , specifically, in areas of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, which is involved with how we view others' mental states, and posterior temporal cortex, which is involved in visual perception particularly in processing facial information.

"This work provides converging evidence in line with other research that the computation of inferring intentions is processed in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex," said senior author Luke Chang, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences and the director of the Computational Social Affective Neuroscience Laboratory (Cosan Lab) at Dartmouth. "We were surprised that this shift in preference for considering others' intentions occurred so late in development. Of course, younger children can infer the intentions of others, but we see that this ability continues to be refined well into late adolescence. This finding has potential implications regarding how much autonomy this age group should be given when making important social and ethical decisions, such as purchasing weapons, going to war, and serving on juries," added Chang.

Explore further: Neurological changes during the transition from adolescence to young adulthood found in autism spectrum disorder

More information: Sunhae Sul et al. Medial prefrontal cortical thinning mediates shifts in other-regarding preferences during adolescence, Scientific Reports (2017). DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-08692-6

Related Stories

Neurological changes during the transition from adolescence to young adulthood found in autism spectrum disorder

June 11, 2015
A study published in the June 2015 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry demonstrates that the atypical trajectory of cortical/brain development in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) ...

Study describes changes to structural brain networks after radiotherapy for brain tumors

June 26, 2017
Researchers compared the thickness of brain cortex in patients with brain tumors before and after radiation therapy was applied and found significant dose-dependent changes in the structural properties of cortical neural ...

Researchers shed light on why people trust

August 11, 2015
Trust matters whether it's love, money or another part of our everyday lives that requires risk, and a new study by a Dartmouth brain researcher and his collaborators sheds light on what motivates people to make that leap ...

Study shows thinning of brain tissue remains in college football players

November 30, 2016
A growing body of research continues to raise concerns about the effects of head trauma sustained while participating in popular contact sports, particularly football. But this may not be confined to professional players ...

Why antisocial youths are less able to take the perspective of others

March 11, 2014
Adolescents with antisocial personality disorder inflict serious physical and psychological harm on both themselves and others. However, little is yet known about the underlying neural processes. Researchers at the University ...

Cognitive-related neural pattern to activate machines

June 14, 2017
Brain-machine interfaces represent a solution for people with physical difficulties to communicate with their physical and social environment. In this work, researchers have identified a functional brain pattern in the prefrontal ...

Recommended for you

Research redefines proteins' role in the development of spinal sensory cells

September 19, 2017
A recent study led by Samantha Butler at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA has overturned a common belief about how a certain class of proteins in the spinal cord regulate ...

The brain at work: Spotting half-hidden objects

September 19, 2017
How does a driver's brain realize that a stop sign is behind a bush when only a red edge is showing? Or how can a monkey suspect that the yellow sliver in the leaves is a round piece of fruit?

Team discovers how to train damaging inflammatory cells to promote repair after stroke

September 19, 2017
White blood cells called neutrophils are like soldiers in your body that form in the bone marrow and at the first sign of microbial attack, head for the site of injury just as fast as they can to neutralize invading bacteria ...

Epileptic seizures show long-distance effects

September 19, 2017
The area in which an epileptic seizure starts in the brain, may be small but it reaches other parts of the brain at distances of over ten centimeters. That distant activity, in turn, influences the epileptic core, according ...

Study uncovers markers for severe form of multiple sclerosis

September 18, 2017
Scientists have uncovered two closely related cytokines—molecules involved in cell communication and movement—that may explain why some people develop progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), the most severe form of the disease. ...

Genetically altered mice bear some hallmarks of human bipolar behavior

September 18, 2017
Johns Hopkins researchers report they have genetically engineered mice that display many of the behavioral hallmarks of human bipolar disorder, and that the abnormal behaviors the rodents show can be reversed using well-established ...

2 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

RobertKarlStonjek
5 / 5 (1) Sep 13, 2017
cont...Game theory was tested in societies that had little contact with the west and little or no contact with the concept of game play. It was found that they responded completely differently to college students playing games such as the ultimatum game, Public Goods game etc and showed no inclination to reciprocity only behaviour and greediness. See 'Economic Man' in Cross-cultural Perspective: Behavioral Experiments in 15 Small-scale Societies' by Joseph Henrich et al.
RobertKarlStonjek
5 / 5 (1) Sep 13, 2017
Using games to evaluated social behaviour is a thoroughly flawed approach and it is quite easy to show this. The very definition of game play as opposed to reality is that one is partitioned from the consequences of one's actions including social implications of greedy behaviour. Children try to beat their parents at games, something which they would never do in real life, for instance, and friends fight to the death against each other in games whereas in real life they may risk their life to save a friend from peril, the exact opposite behaviour.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.