Sleep-disordered breathing in early pregnancy linked to insulin resistance

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Sleep-disordered breathing in early pregnancy is associated with insulin resistance or difficulty clearing glucose from the blood, suggests a small study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The results strengthen the link between sleep-disordered breathing, which includes pauses or slowing of breathing during sleep, and gestational diabetes. They also suggest that screening pregnant women, particularly those with overweight or obesity, for sleep-disordered breathing could identify those who might benefit from early interventions to reduce their diabetes risk.

The study monitored the of 221 with overweight or obesity from the 11th through 15th week of their pregnancies and measured their insulin resistance. The more frequently they experienced sleep-disordered breathing and the more often their blood oxygen levels dropped during sleep, the more likely they were to have and elevated fasting blood sugar levels. This risk persisted after the investigators considered participants' age, body mass index and other factors.

Laura Sanapo, M.D., of the Women's Medicine Collaborative and Brown University Providence, Rhode Island, and colleagues conducted the study, which appears in Sleep.


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More information: Laura Sanapo et al, Association between sleep disordered breathing in early pregnancy and glucose metabolism, Sleep (2022). doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsab281
Journal information: Sleep

Citation: Sleep-disordered breathing in early pregnancy linked to insulin resistance (2022, January 6) retrieved 17 August 2022 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-01-sleep-disordered-early-pregnancy-linked-insulin.html
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